Barbara Stanwyck Poster

Quotes (19)

  • During Double Indemnity (1944), Fred MacMurray would go to rushes [viewings of daily completed shots]. I remember asking Fred, "How was I?" [Fred's response was] "I don't know about you, but I was wonderful!" Such a true remark. Actors only look at themselves.
  • I'm a tough old broad from Brooklyn. I intend to go on acting until I'm ninety and they won't need to paste my face with make-up.
  • [Referring to director Frank Capra] Eyes are the greatest tool in film. Mr. Capra taught me that. Sure, it's nice to say very good dialogue, if you can get it. But great movie acting - watch the eyes!
  • Put me in the last fifteen minutes of a picture and I don't care what happened before. I don't even care if I was IN the rest of the damned thing - I'll take it in those fifteen minutes.
  • My only problem is finding a way to play my fortieth fallen female in a different way from my thirty-ninth.
  • [In 1939 on the fact that her fiancĂ©, Robert Taylor, was four years younger than she] The boy's got a lot to learn and I've got a lot to teach.
  • It's perhaps not the future I would choose. I still think it's possible to make a success of both marriage and career, even though I didn't. But it's not a bad future. And I'm not afraid of it.
  • I couldn't remember my name for weeks. I'd be at the theater and hear them calling, "Miss Stanwyck, Miss Stanwyck", and I'd think, "Where is that dame? Why doesn't she answer? By crickie, it's me!"
  • Egotism - usually just a case of mistaken nonentity.
  • There's nothing more fun in the whole world than seeing a child open a present at Christmas. To have a six-year-old boy stroke a bicycle with his eyes and, not daring to touch, turn and ask, "Is it mine, Missy? Really mine?" That's part of my future. The rest is work. And, I hope, some wisdom.
  • Career is too pompous a word. It was a job and I have always felt privileged to be paid for doing what I love doing.
  • Attention embarrasses me. I don't like to be on display.
  • I want to go on until they have to shoot me.
  • [on filming Titanic (1953)] The night we were making the scene of the dying ship in the outdoor tank at Twentieth, it was bitter cold. I was 47 feet up in the air in a lifeboat swinging on the davits. The water below was agitated into a heavy rolling mass and it was thick with other lifeboats full of women and children. I looked down and thought, "If one of these ropes snaps now, it's good-by for you". Then I looked up at the faces lined along the rail -those left behind to die with the ship. I thought of the men and women who had been through this thing in our time. We were re-creating an actual tragedy and I burst into tears. I shook with great racking sobs and couldn't stop.
  • [In the 1960s, explaining her four-year absence from films after Forty Guns (1957)] Nobody asked me. They don't normally write parts for women my age because America is now a country of youth. We've matured and moved on. The past belongs to the past.
  • Some kids are born with bad blood just like horses. When a parent has done everything possible, the only solution is to save yourself.
  • [on performing her favorite title role in Stella Dallas (1937)] The task was to convince audiences that Stella's instincts were fine and noble even though, on the surface she was loud, flamboyant, and a bit vulgar.
  • (On her character in Sorry, Wrong Number (1948) "Almost from the word go, she is way up there emotionally, and stays there day after day...I decided I'd prefer to jump in, bam, go, stay there, up, try to sustain it all the way and shoot the works."
  • (On making Sorry, Wrong Number (1948) "Five days I was handling it, starting the next day's work where I'd picked up, sustaining it all, and then I had two whole days to relax and not to worry about the character, and I tell you it was strange. It was really hard to pump myself up on Monday morning to try to feel that desperate tension."