Adam West Poster

Quotes (30)

  • [on his typecasting as The Caped Crusader] It was inescapable. I'd just about land something substantial, something I like or a good career move. Then some dinosaur would rear up and say, "But the audience will think of him as Batman." It was formidable. It was there like a brick wall.
  • [on his disappointment with the direction Batman (1966) was taking, especially during its second and third seasons] "Batman" was an expensive show and it was losing money. I became extremely frustrated and unhappy and wanted out. There was nothing I could do to convince the producers or the studio to make improvements. I was just a hired hand. Eventually, I lost all interest because I felt the series was being neglected. They weren't spending the money they should have, and we weren't getting the scripts we deserved. I didn't want any part of this situation any more. I was tired of fighting for better shows. The program I wanted to do was no longer possible. But I hated to leave the character because Batman had been good to me.
  • [on his being passed over for Tim Burton's 1989 Batman (1989)] I cried for an hour, but then I was okay. I wanted it! I don't know. I figured that's their business and they have a film in mind. I've already done it. I've done my Batman. Look, do you want the classic Coke or the new stuff? Maybe both. I do know that I'm disappointed not to have had a chance to play Batman, but they have their vision and I have mine.
  • I can't tell you how grateful I am to those fans. They are not stupid. I think they appreciate my sincerity and my work. Actors want to be loved. Batman (1966) has done that for me. I have an audience out there which is always waiting to see whatever I do. And new generations are constantly discovering me in reruns. So, as long as I stay sharp, good things can still happen for me. Meanwhile, I keep hoping that a wonderful opportunity will come along. Believe me, my life ain't so bad, after all.
  • Before I was limited to playing leads in low-budget movies. The series has given me the exposure - God knows - so that perhaps I would now be considered for important pictures, which is what I'm after.
  • [If he was worried about playing Batman]: I was worried at first. I was afraid that my own identity might be submerged in the trappings of a freak in tights. But then I realized I should be able to make the craze work to my advantage.
  • [When responded if he sat in the bar]: No, I'll sit at the bar. I don't want to be conspicuous.
  • [Of his Batman (1966) experience] Regardless of how rough the identity factor has made it to go on, looking at the balance sheet, I'm grateful for the Bat. It did more for me than against me. It gave [me] money, an international name, the kind of recognition that has allowed me to at least disprove what it caused. That may be tougher than starting from scratch, I don't know.
  • [In 1972] I think when you examine other careers, there's always a cooling-off period. They go on to other things, but there's a cooling-off period. You can't sit on your duff and wait for the phone of ring and someone say you're a star. You have to get out and work for it.
  • But of course, it's up to me to make whatever roles I play convincing and believable.
  • [about his career after being typecast as Batman] I was rushed into some not very good movies, and I just hit the beach and nursed my wounds for a while. Part of it was the dinosaurs of Hollywood went away, people who don't get it. I was certainly more welcome when the younger people came in.
  • [In 2003] That was a reference to Batman drinking the mickey in that first episode and him doing the Batusi. I'm always asked, "Do the Batusi!".
  • [In 1998] There's no Bat gadget better than a seat belt for safety.
  • [In 1966] Batman must be played with utter conviction. There is a line which I must follow, between satirizing the character and playing it dead-serious.
  • [on one of his hobbies] It's important to us. Wetumpka isn't considered a great golf school, but this would be a great way to go out. We've got some young guys who need to keep getting better.
  • [on returning to the role that made him famous] It's dramatized to an extent, but most of it really did happen. All good comedy is based on truth. Now they're saying we're a wonderful comedy team. What were we before?
  • Unless the thinking of the major producers has become senile, they can perceive that I'm not Batman.
  • [Who told spectators The Penguin was a villain on Batman (1966)]: Robin and I were in the middle of Thanksgiving dinner in the Batcave when we got word the Penguin might be in Houston so we rushed over.
  • [In 2010] I think it evolved. I learned a long time ago that because people love Batman, I should too. I learned that I shouldn't resent it even though it prevented me from getting other roles. I really had to become fond of Batman in order to deal with it. I embraced it.
  • [In 1989] Who can say it's a mistake, but I know from my mail, and I get thousands of letters from Batman fans, that they resent it.
  • [His thoughts on the effect Batman (1966) has had on his life] In a lot of people's mind, I AM Batman, and that's been kind of a two-edged sword.
  • [on wearing his costume on Batman (1966)] It brought me an occasional reward. The tights were itchy, and it was really, really hot. Believe me, it was 180 degrees under that cowl. But it was magic. I would pull it on and I would think, "Let's go out and play Batman & Robin!". It's the only way you could get at it, to be childlike and remember those times.
  • [on the frustrations in trying to break out of the "Batman" shadow] I'd go in to have meetings about different role that were more serious or substantial than what one might have considered Batman to have been. They would usually wind up saying, "Batman can't be in bed with Faye Dunaway.".
  • [In 1997] I could even wear my old tights, after getting all the mothballs out of it, and come back in the original Batmobile.
  • [In 1995] That typecasting is a mean, long-fanged yellow dog that grabbed my leg about three in the morning at least once a week. It was tough to deal with.
  • If you hang around long enough, they think you're good. It's either my tenacity or my stupidity, I'm not sure which.
  • [on some of his ideas for stories on Batman (1966)] My Bruce Wayne would have been romancing Catwoman with a brandy snifter full of milk. Then he would have said something silly, like "Man cannot live on milk alone.".
  • But I am simple in that I no longer feel the need to walk on a red carpet. I am a private person. I don't need a lot of company. And I find it really, really difficult to talk about myself.
  • [In 2005] Batman was comedy, let's face it. What I loved about Batman was his total lack of awareness when it came to his interaction with the outside world. He actually believed nobody could recognize him on the phone, when he was being Bruce Wayne, even though he made no attempt to disguise his voice.
  • When fans ask me for advice, here's what I tell them: "Remain an optimist."