User Reviews (2,947)

  • Jean-Mi Super5 November 2014
    10/10
    Nolan's masterpiece, one of the best sci-fi movie
    I have been a cinema lover for years, read a lot of reviews on IMDb and everywhere, and never found the right movie to write my first review. I always thought I would wait for THE movie.

    And this is IT!

    When I first heard that Nolan was preparing a sci-fi movie, I felt like a kid again, waiting for his Christmas gift under the tree. I knew it would become a classic. And I'm sure it will.

    First of all, it is incredibly beautiful to watch. Honestly, it was so beautiful that I felt like I was sucked into the movie. The way Nolan decided to show some scenes really remind me of 2001 A Space Odyssey (actually many things will probably remind you of this movie). We can feel the talent of Christopher Nolan, just by looking at the way it is filmed. The techniques he used contribute to create that visual environment in a believable way.

    The sound environment is just mesmerizing. It is a very important part of the movie, because some scenes take place in space, and Noland just found the right way to use sound. The soundtrack (made by the great Hans Zimmer) is breathtaking, epic, amazing, unreal. I could find a lot more adjectives to qualify it, but you have to hear it to understand how epic they are.

    These two important parts (image and sound) create a stunning atmosphere. You will forget you are in a movie theater, and you will be lost in space, sucked into the adventures of this new Space Odyssey, begging for more. It is a truly unique experience. I can say that I have never felt something like that in a movie theater (at least not for the past ten years).

    Then, of course, the cast. First of all, Matthew McConaughey. I discovered this actor in Tropic Thunder, but he didn't really convince me, though he was quite funny. Then I saw Dallas Buyers Club. Since that movie, I love him. In this movie... Well, he is the movie. I exaggerate a bit, since there are other great actors (some even unexpected with a special guest) who play extremely well. But he is just what was needed to feel the human part of the story (which is very important in Interstellar). He is capable of making us feel so many different emotions all along the story, as a father, as a human. Anne Hathaway was very convincing, all together the actors managed to create some harmony, which makes the human interactions credible. Caine, Chastaing and Affleck are a perfect choice. And then there is... The special guest, I will call him "X". His role, which could be seen as a minor role, is actually much more important than that. He proves, once again, that he is a great actor. Watch and see.

    And finally, the scenario/story. I won't spoil anything here; I'll just try to convince you how great it is. Nolan is known to revolutionize everything when he tries a new genre in cinema. Well, once again he did it. With The Dark Knight he revolutionized the superhero genre. With Interstellar he's revolutionizing the sci-fi genre in cinema. From what I heard, he worked with a physicist (in gravitational physics and astrophysics) to help him with that movie. And we can feel and see it. During the fifties, Asimov laid the foundations of modern science fiction. Lucas and Kubrick did the same in cinema. Today, Nolan is laying the new foundations of the genre in cinema, proving that cinema is still at the beginning of what can be done (brace yourselves my friends, we have not seen anything yet).

    Why? Well, simply because we only know a few things about space, some things can't be proved for the moment, so we can use theory, and make the best of it. That is exactly what Nolan did. He used theories that exist today, and made a movie about mankind, about pioneers, about humanity, about us.

    Because, in spite of all the sci-fi aspect, it is a story about humanity. McConaughey, Hathaway, and mainly "X", will managed to convince you about that.

    My rating for this movie can only be a 10, because in itself, it is a beginning for a new kind of cinema. It IS a classic. Those who say "we can't compare this movie to 2001 Space Odyssey, nor can we compare Nolan to Kubrick" are wrong. We can, and we should. Talented people don't live only in the past, some genius live today, among us. And Nolan is one of them. Many say that he is overrated. I truly don't think so. Only time will answer that.

    This is the sci-fi movie of the decade, and probably the best movie Nolan ever made. Just go for it, without a second thought.
  • tardieu-felix1 November 2014
    10/10
    Interstellar : An open-hearted & mastered Human Odyssey
    The film begins by establishing at his own rhythm its ambitions: men overexploited land resources, which is why the only goal they have left is to survive. This life is not enough for Cooper, brilliantly played by McConaughey who gave body and soul to this character. But all of this wouldn't hold without the total control of Christopher Nolan, based on the languishing soundtrack by Hans Zimmer, the luminous and impenetrable photography of Hoyte Van Hoytema, and the sincerity of Nolan's directing. He manages to film the characters and to find the right cut at the right time, always in harmony with Hans Zimmer's soundtrack, to give the film an aspiring and inspiring dimension that went missing for many many years. Thus we are transported into the same cockpit that Cooper, we feel the same remorse that he can already feel, we feel the same gravity, and we feel the same fear of the unknown melted with the force of his will. All of this is brilliantly illustrated in a very simple directing choice, which from my point of view is the decisive impetus of the film: to directly jump from when Cooper leaves in his truck, leaving his family behind him, to Endurance taking off. This simple editing decision allows Nolan to give an original movement to his film, and the musical crescendo makes us physically feel the sentimental break between two parts of the film.

    You don't necessarily have to understand it immediately : The film will raise questions in you, such as : what is it to be a human being, is there some physical limitations to our humanity, how far could we be willing to go to determine knowledge, is there other dimensions that we can not access to, and above all: what is the nature of this intact and immutable bond that unites us to others wherever we are in the universe ? Is this bond only intelligible, or is it also tangible ? All these questions resonate in harmony in Nolan's Interstellar.

    Interstellar is itself a crescendo, increasing sensitivity and creativity. I use the term deliberately because it goes crescendo with the soundtrack by Hans Zimmer, which is one of the most beautiful music ever scored for a sci-fi movie. We are witnessing a perfect musical arrangement, a total symbiosis, a bit like the music of Gravity which had understood very well how to match the image and the rhythm of a sequence to its own musicality. Zimmer's crescendos are giving a new powerful breath to every new scene, whether it is in visually powerful & intense moments or in more intimate moments; it intrudes into our momentary feelings and sensations, and manages to extend them, sometimes almost to choking, before resting on the balance of the film frame along with our mind spell-bounded.

    I have seen all the talent of the director that I knew he was outside the norm, but whom I did not know his capacity to reinvent itself. Because this is it: Interstellar is not an action movie, not really a blockbuster, and it goes not entirely but mostly again the expectations of common people. It's much more than that. This is much more than just a sci-fi movie. It is unlike any of his previous films. Some hoped to see Interstellar as Christopher Nolan's best film, and they were disappointed that this was not the case. And indeed, THIS IS NOT THE BEST FILM of Christopher Nolan. Because in a way, IT IS HIS FIRST FILM. I'm not saying that Interstellar is not as good as his other films, it goes beyond all of them. But to me Interstellar is the first film of a new stage in Nolan's filmography ; it is a masterpiece as it the beginning of a work ahead. Interstellar is the proof that Nolan has finally managed, despite all the expectations that were placed on him after the success of The Dark Knight, to move away from his own reputation to create a personal work, original, humble, sincere and deeply, meticulously, measured.

    Now, in this third act of the film, it all comes to life with unparalleled strength. Nolan poses and answers questions that raise others. But he focuses his attention on the great mystery of love, that emotional bond that can unite men and sometimes separate them. But Nolan is the only one that can successfully speak of love from a being to another in a film that mainly takes place in a another galaxy. From my point of view, only Solaris by Steven Soderbergh (2002), unfortunately neglected by the audience, was able to accomplish that. Interstellar is based on a premise which is the following : from terrestrial dust to the depths of space and time, we can never be separated from who we are as individuals and as a species, as we always leave a part of ourselves "behind" us. In other words, I could say that this is a human story, and even if we go as far as we want to, if we travel through the universe believing that we can be detached of the one we are fond of, we will only get closer to them. Because the separation, and thus the distance and time, can only ultimately reinforce the relationship between the people who really love each other. Because it is going to the end of the world, when we reach the end of ourselves, that we reach the singularity of the "black hole beyond the horizon" * : it is our humanity. No, I wasn't been able to find any bad flaws in the film. Not one, and I'm still looking. After all, Interstellar is like gravity, "all it takes is a little push ! "

    *you'll have to see the movie to figure that one out.

    Félix Tardieu, November 1st, 2014
  • Malthe Tuxen24 May 2017
    10/10
    Maybe Nolan's Best Film Yet
    Warning: Spoilers
    It is about an hour since the movie stopped for me and i still can't stop thinking about it. First of all it was one of the most beautiful visuals i have ever seen in a movie. The story is amazing and with just as many twists as Nolan usually gives. The ending is incredible and will leave you thinking for hours. Without a doubt one of the most beautiful story's, in a Nolan movie.

    Even with all the action and scenes flying in space , it is still mostly about a mans relationship with his daughter. I wont go into the story all i have to say it is one of the best movies i have ever seen, and the reason i wont go into the story is because it is much better just going in, having almost no idea what is going to happen.

    The cast is great Matthew McConaughey really gives his most powerful performance to date, and truly shows what he is capable of, given a good script. Also incredible performances from the pretty well known actors such as Matt Damon, Michael Caine, and Anne Hathaway. And also from some amazing not as well known actors like, Casey Affleck, Jessica Chastain, Dave Gyasi, and many others.

    I want to end by saying if you are a fan of Christopher Nolan, Watch this movie as soon as possible, and I promise you won't be disappointed. I hope you found this review helpful, and I hope you will love the movie as much as I do. 10/10
  • Calum Rhys8 November 2014
    A Visually Monumental And Thoughtful Sci-Fi Epic
    I was extremely lucky to get the chance to see this film upon its first day release, before entering the cinema, my expectations were already high, after all, this was a film from the cinematic genius who brought us the likes of 'Inception' and 'The Dark Knight', to summarise the following review in a single sentence: I left the cinema in extreme awe from the visual masterpiece I had just viewed. A film that explores the psychological and emotional state of a man whose life revolves around his family, 'Interstellar' is a thrilling and thought-provoking film that boasts an intellectual story masterfully written by the Nolan brothers. Whilst there seems to have been influence from films like '2001: A Space Odyssey' and 'Apollo 13', 'Interstellar' is unique in its own way. Whilst the subject may be hard to comprehend at times, it can't be denied how visually monumental and thoughtful Christopher Nolan's epic science fiction masterpiece is, and can easily be named the best film of this year and possibly one of the greatest science fiction films to have ever graced the screen. A sheer brilliant feat of cinema.
  • slayerjmk953 November 2014
    9/10
    An Emotional, Beautiful Journey into the Unknown
    (This is both a review of the film, and an assertion of Christopher Nolan's filmmaking style)

    There have been many reviewers and critics alike that have high praise for the film (the visual effects, the acting, the music), but say how it's not Christopher Nolan's best directed film. This is where i personally would have to disagree. Before i get into it, though, i'll talk about Interstellar a bit.

    Interstellar is truly a sci-fi epic like no other. To compare said film to '2001: A Space Odyssey' isn't just a disservice, but unnecessary. The films are almost nothing alike, simply sharing small plot elements. Also, Stanley Kubrick's vision of Arthur C. Clarke's sci-fi epic wasn't to ponder the philosophical questions that accompanied the story, but to make art, and art is was, and is. With Interstellar, Mr. Nolan set out to make his most personal and emotional film to date about love and time (time being a recurring theme throughout all of Nolan's films). But it's so much more than that too. There are no words to express the epic journey Nolan takes us on in the film, but needless to say, it's tear-jerking and emotional throughout. The acting is top-notch, especially McConaughey, who gives (I would say) his most emotional performance yet. But the actor who stole the show in a few scenes (one in particular, when they're on an alien planet) was David Gyasi as Romilly, one of the astronauts aboard the Endurance, their spacecraft. The musical score from Hans Zimmer is, without a doubt, his best and most influential work to date, helping drive the film's bold and breath-taking vision (the church organ helped significantly). The visual effects are easily the best to date as well, and of the year. To see a black hole created through visual effects in such a way, with pages theoretical equations provided by Kip Thorne (theoretical physicist, of whom's work inspired the film's genesis); what you see in the film is the most realistic depiction of a black hole, and even offered new insight to accretion discs surrounding the anomalies. But even everything else, from the alien planets to the Endurance, the visuals always look real. Then, there's the writing. I would definitely have to say this has some of the best dialogue i've ever heard in a sci-fi movie, and the script continually pours or oozes emotion, keeping the audience tethered to the film.

    Now, about Mr. Nolan. Don't just look at Nolan, but look at his films. Some say Inception would be his masterpiece, while others would say it's The Dark Knight, or Memento. But honestly, every single film Christopher Nolan has directed is a masterpiece not of its genre, but of Nolan. Following is his quiet masterpiece, not the film that put Mr. Nolan on the map as a phenomenal director, but one people visited or revisited after becoming accustomed to Nolan, after seeing Memento, what could be called his breakout masterpiece. Then, right after, he directed the remake of the Norwegian thriller, Insomnia. This, too, could be considered a masterpiece, even if a remake. Then, we were given his take on the Batman universe, starting with Batman Begins, the origin masterpiece. Then, there's The Prestige, adapted from the novel of the same name, which can be called his dark masterpiece. The Dark Knight, his bold masterpiece; Inception, his complex masterpiece, and The Dark Knight Rises, his flawed masterpiece. Now, we have Interstellar, his emotional or personal masterpiece.

    This is just my looking at Nolan and his films, but whatever your thoughts are, you can't deny Interstellar is one hell of a journey. He certainly is one of the best filmmakers of our time, and of all time. I can't wait to see what he does next, but i'm not sure it will be as emotionally powerful as Interstellar.
  • Tyler Miller5 November 2014
    10/10
    'Interstellar'
    'Interstellar' was incredible. The visuals, the score, the acting, were all amazing. The plot is definitely one of the most original I've seen in a while. Most of the critic reviews have said that some bits are a little too unbelievable, but I have to disagree. Yes, there were some parts that were definitely in the "fi" part of sci-fi. But the thing is, 'Interstellar' deals with concepts that we know very little about. We have no idea what the 4th or 5th dimension is like, or what it would be like to go through a wormhole or a black hole. I don't think it's fair to call something unbelievable, when we have absolutely no idea what WOULD be believable in those circumstances. Either way, excellent writing from the Nolan brothers. The visuals were outstanding, and will no doubt be nominated for an Oscar. The performances were excellent, though nothing Oscar worthy, as is the case with most of Nolan's films ('The Dark Knight' being the obvious exception). Hans Zimmer's score was amazing and blended perfectly with the film. All in all, 'Interstellar' is an excellent movie, which I personally think is Nolan's most beautiful film to date.
  • shawneofthedead7 November 2014
    7/10
    A good - not great - movie that falls apart the more you think about it.
    Warning: Spoilers
    Not many directors have the clout of Christopher Nolan. Most of them receive notes from their fretting studios: suggestions (or demands) to change plot points or highlight certain characters/actors, which must be adhered to for contractual or financial reasons. With huge, intelligent blockbuster successes like the Dark Knight franchise and Inception, Nolan has deservedly won carte blanche from Warner Bros. for Interstellar - he gets garguantan sums of money and complete autonomy to realise his artistic vision. In effect, he's making an indie movie on a blockbuster scale. Ironically, this lack of oversight might be just what keeps Interstellar - a very good, occasionally brilliant foray into the furthest reaches of our galaxy and beyond - from greatness.

    Cooper (Matthew McConaughey), a former pilot and engineer, is now reluctantly scraping together a living as a farmer on a starving Earth. With sandstorms swirling and food supplies dwindling by the day, it doesn't seem likely that Cooper's children, stoic Tom and inquisitive Murphy, will have much of a world left to inherit when they grow up. While investigating a "ghost" in Murphy's bedroom, Cooper deciphers a message that brings him to a top-secret NASA base. Once there, Cooper learns from his former mentor, Dr Brand (Michael Caine), that NASA is looking for solutions to Earth's crisis in other galaxies. A recently-opened wormhole has given NASA and its scientists access to a whole new galaxy of planets. Brand appeals to Cooper to pilot the final and most important mission: to determine whether any of three identified planets can truly host human life. But it's a journey from which Cooper might never return - one that will take him away from his kids and everything he has ever known and loved.

    That's not even the half of it – Nolan's narrative is a sprawling, ambitious one that asks heavy metaphysical questions about the position and role of humanity in the universe, filtered through the prism of a father and daughter whose bond transcends time and space. It's shot through with complex scientific theories about wormholes and time travel courtesy of theoretical physicist Kip Thorne (who served as a consultant on the film). Indeed, much of Interstellar plays with such philosophical gravity that one can't help wondering if it's simply too deep a subject to be effectively communicated in a movie that must also create emotional stakes and real characters.

    Clocking in at almost three hours, Interstellar pulses with intelligence and occasional bursts of brilliance. The science and emotion of its story works best on each planet they manage to visit, with Nolan crafting some chillingly smart sci-fi moments amidst the human drama experienced by Cooper's crew. As badly as Cooper wants to save enough fuel to make the return trip home, Amelia Brand (Anne Hathaway) has both professional and personal stakes in visiting the planet that's furthest away from the wormhole. They trade hope for time, the minutes they use to hunt for salvation translating into the loss of decades with their loved ones. The film is at its best when the members of the Endurance - including David Gyasi's Romilly and Wes Bentley's Doyle - confront one another, and establish contact (or fail to do so) with the scouting teams that preceded them through the wormhole.

    But Interstellar also suffers from a bloated and faintly silly final act. The science of it may be well-founded (who knows, after all, what miraculous answers really do lie within a black hole?) and the concept very cool, but it doesn't quite translate as such. Instead, the film hyper-blasts itself into a oddly cheerful (and confusing) ending that feels purely fictional and not at all scientific. There's no denying, either, that Nolan could have carved half an hour or more out of Interstellar without losing any of its narrative or emotional density. Instead, many scenes unfold in an almost obstinately languid fashion, including a moment when Cooper is left gasping for oxygen on the icy terrain of an alien planet. It's pretty evident, too, that Nolan really wanted to make sure his audiences knew how little greenscreen he used to make the film; for no other discernible reason, his camera lingers in extreme close-up - and far too often - on the exterior shells of the various spacecrafts designed for the film.

    Nolan can afford the best when it comes to his cast as well, and it shows. McConaughey anchors the film with a gravitas and tenderness quite unknown before his career McConnaissance, and he's ably supported by a steely Hathaway, whose character, just like the film she's in, blends cold, pragmatic science with a churning wealth of emotion. Jessica Chastain and Matt Damon, in roles perhaps best left unspecified to avoid any explicit spoilers, are excellent too - the former radiates quite enough warmth and intelligence to make us believe that she can save the world, and the latter admirably treads in morally grey areas to good effect.

    For months before its release, Nolan kept Interstellar firmly under wraps. Everyone speculated that it would be a game-changer - a sci- fi blockbuster as thrilling and thought-provoking as it is entertaining. In some ways, that's true of the final product: Nolan's film is brave, brainy film-making, and it looks absolutely spectacular. But, on closer examination, Interstellar loses some of its gloss and varnish - and beneath it all lies an unwieldy script that meanders a little too long and wastes a little too much of the big, breathtaking ideas that underpin its story.
  • Terry Peck21 November 2014
    1/10
    Less than stellar by at least 5 dimensions
    Warning: Spoilers
    I got something out of this movie. I really did. It was 35 degrees Celsius outside the cinema and all I needed was a three hour nap in cool air-conditioning. Lucky me! The latest Nolan film, just there for the taking.

    It started off as I hoped it would, all dusty on the porch of some ranch in the middle of the U.S. otherwise known as nowhere, the end of the world syrupy American-style, little kid tugging at the heart strings - my eyelids already beginning to droop even before Coop and his daughter Murph wind up at some place that some old cockney and his very Jewish daughter inhabit (guess it only happens in movies with a blind casting director), but that was fine, I was almost in REM sleep - not having been able to process a word of dialogue from McConaughey in over 20 minutes. Pure bliss.

    And it got even better from an insomniac's point of view. Thanks to an absurd plot and woefully unimaginative CGI effects, my chin was almost on my chest when they landed on the first planet the other side of... well, let's just call it credulity. I don't sleep this well at home! Wait! We're going through another Kubrick-style time dimension - didn't we just spend half an hour on this planet re-using some special effects, this time made to look like giant waves, left over from Inception? I think so, but time warps so nicely when you're practically snoring.

    I think we lost an astronaut somewhere. Maybe that's the game. Who's next? I hope it's the astrophysicist who explains wormholes with a moebius strip he forgets to twist. Either that or it was origami for dummies. Maybe that *was* the guy we just lost - hard to tell, they all act the same. Flat as the dialogue. Thanks guys. Anyway, we can only pray it will be Hathaway soon. She's starting to keep me awake. How can a head bob about so much in weightlessness? But I'm being unfair; I think I remember her trying to act some of this script. Brave move from an Oscar winner. I'm starting to want my money back.

    Anyway, I'm roused a bit now and thus a bit grumpy. We're in another galaxy's version of Antarctica minus the faintest signs of life - this despite (because of?) the unzipping of a new bad actor. Fortunately, this actor goes even beyond his usual leaden deadness and I'm soon starting to lose consciousness again and time travel merrily back to the land of nod. I think there was a plot twist involved because this astronaut is trying to do a Dave and HAL routine. He must think he's in a good movie. Poor sod.

    Did I mention there must have been yards of Inception on the cutting-room floor last time because I'm watching more and more outtakes? Gotta save a few million here and there.

    I had a dream. I dreamed that Nolan would come up with a slew of insanely bizarre plot twists right at the end that would explain the entire reason for watching this flick. But they carried me out on a stretcher before I found out if it was true. Apparently, I was having a nightmare screaming "Morse Code! No! No! No! Not Morse Code! That's Spielberg!" at the top of my lungs and disturbing the other patrons' naps. I was obviously paying too much attention even comatose.
  • gstards4 November 2014
    10/10
    A Love Story Against The Backdrop Of A Grand Interstellar Travel
    Love is the one thing that transcends time and space...

    New creation of Christopher Nolan's genius, whose name is now known to everyone. His films are waiting with a special look, because it offers something that every day, unfortunately, less and less can be found in the world of mass cinema - an interesting spectacle, filled with meaning, ideas and emotions. At this time, Christopher decided to send us not to the world of dreams, and even not on the dark streets of Gotham City. No, now he send us to the journey to, and perhaps beyond the boundaries of the possible and impossible, through the curvature of space and time, in other worlds. And you won't forget this trip, this can be assured.

    I was madly waiting for Interstellar's release. And then, finally, I was able to see this Beauty - at the premiere in my coutry on October, 29. It was incredibly exciting. It was a delight. It was unforgettable. It was gorgeous. Nolan once again amazes the viewer's imagination by his painting. Journey to the brink of infinity, the line where humanity has never set, acts as either the first-born purpose and a background of emotional history about the father and the daughter. A loving father who mankind need to help, but that he should leave his children, and a loving daughter who doesn't want to let her dad in the infinity darkness.

    Starting from the very first frame and ending with the closing credits, a new picture of Nolan will absorb you completely, forcing stare at the screen during the whole action, because it's all so exciting and interesting that escape becomes physically impossible. No, this three hours won't fly quickly for you. You'll feel every emotion, every event, every character. You will not look how the main characters travel through the universe, because the movie experience in this film is so excellent that you will be on board of "Endurance" starship and travel between the worlds with the main characters by yourself.

    The emotional core of this story is the relationship of Matthew McConaughey's character and his daughter - Mackenzie Foy' and Jessica Chastain' character. And the acting work of these three artists in "Interstellar" impress the most. McConaughey was acting really great, and this is one of the most emotional, if not the most emotional role of his life. All the drama and tragedy of the relationship of father and daughter in this film will not leave anyone indifferent. Anne Hathaway, Wes Bentley, Michael Caine, Casey Affleck, Ellen Burstyn and other actors also coped with their roles and presented the film's supporting characters very realistic. I would particularly like to note a small but important in this story role of Matt Damon, a character who has received quite memorable. If we talk about the characters, it should be noted also two robots that accompanied our heroes in this difficult journey. One of them adds a touch of humor in the film, which mitigates constantly depressing, dramatic, and sometimes really dark atmosphere.

    The script of the film is very well combined the history of space exploration and the relationship between Cooper and Murph. The story is complex and complicated, is based on real scientific theories by Kip Thorne, and indeed contains a reference to the "Space Odyssey" and other sci-fi pictures. This story about true love, about loyalty, forgiveness, fraud, hard decisions, and much more. And it is designed so that leaves a lot of room for the imagination of the viewer. It's also possible to notice some structure allusion to another Nolan's work - Inception. The story and visuals are combined just perfectly in Interstellar.

    Hans Zimmer's score, written by him on the basis of only one letter from Nolan, hold the key: "Once we become parents, we can't help but look at ourselves through the eyes of our children", deserves a special praise. On this basis, Hans managed to write just incredible soundtrack that perfectly harmonizes with the history and the visual side of the picture. And this work of the composer is really different from the previous ones. It is executed in a different style from another subject in its base. Very impressive work, which will be pleasantly listened again and separate from the film itself.

    Visual range of the picture is incredibly beautiful and circuses. The "Endurance" itself, new worlds, insanely beautiful and mysterious space, wormholes, black holes, and travel through them, folds of time and space are arranged so that is simply breathtaking. I would like to thank all those who contributed to the creation of a visual of this film. It must be seen. That mastery with which this is done, not just words. In the visual pattern also has some references to the Kubrick's "Odyssey", and they are pleasing to the eye.

    Many thanks to Christopher Nolan for having given us such an incredible movie, which once again proved to us that the cinema is Nolan's life.

    "Interstellar" is a film that wins the hearts of the audience not only with its sci-fi splendor, but also an emotional story that lies at its very heart. This film is not only about the discoveries, space exploration and the final frontier of mankind, but also about the relationship of father and daughter, who were in a difficult situation in life when one has to leave the other in the name of a goal that can not be underestimated. So, with what Nolan's genius unfolds before us this action is beyond praise. Combining the story, filled with not only real science fiction, but the true human values ​​and emotions, outstanding and very emotional performances, breathtaking visuals, epic and dramatic soundtrack, Christopher Nolan breathed the life into this film by his directing to create something truly masterpiece again.

    "Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night... Rage, Rage Against The Dying Of The Light."
  • aldamayo4 November 2014
    9/10
    A familiar journey to the unknown, albeit a grand one
    So last night I got the chance to see the early screening of Christopher Nolan's Interstellar. The film I've been waiting so much from the early days of the shooting. How did it fare? Here's my take:

    To avoid any tl;dr risk, let me get this straight from the very beginning, Interstellar is one goddamnedly good film, it gets you to the edge of your seat, it soars, it warps, it rips your brain senseless. It's that good.

    Interstellar is a story about the earth dying, with its soil no longer able to sustain crops other than corn, and of course, it will lead to the extinction of humanity. Our hero is an ex-NASA test pilot named Cooper (Matthew McConaughey), a typical ordinary-guy-in-an-extraordinary- situation everyman who's also a dedicated family man, especially toward his daughter Murphy (named after the Murphy's Law). In an all-too-Armageddon style our hero gets invited by the (publicly) defunct NASA to become humanity's last hope in finding a new home, for they have found a wormhole near Saturn (2001, anyone?) which will warp the astronauts to another galaxy in quest of a habitable planet. Solid and compact premise, although it's been used before.

    For seasoned filmgoers, there are many similar elements (although it's understandable) with Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) and Robert Zemeckis' Contact (1997). In a sense that this is not a bang-bang-shoot-shoot-blow-em-up sci-fi, but more of a slow-burning, metaphysical sci-fi which gets you to think about your place in the universe and your exact place in time.

    Similarity with 2001 and Contact is never a bad thing, but it becomes a wee bit too predictable, although Nolan is a smart enough director in providing the final (a very sentimental one, I should say) twist in the story. The visuals in this film is majestic, everything is shot to a meticulously calculated level, Nolan-style. The space scenes are serenely suspenseful just like Cuaron's Gravity, but unlike the documentary feel of Gravity, there's a real gusto and pace to these scenes. You should also be prepared for the (for some, maybe) unexpected third act, it is Nolan's most sentimental and humane moment to date. And this is why Interstellar is more than just a science-fiction, it is a human drama intertwined in space and time loop.

    One thing that Nolan gets a bit wrong is the narrative. Nolan was never a 'warm' director, his films are filled with brilliant ideas and flair but it feels cold, it maybe suits Memento and The Dark Knight but in Interstellar he seems to have been lost in determining which of the interpersonal drama or the sci-fi that will be Interstellar's forte. The result is a rather incongruous script, intermittently cutting off the excitement of the previous scene and so on. But it is a forgivable sin, for the good is a lot more than the bad in this monumental film. At the end of the day, all I can say is that Interstellar is a grand film. It is monolithic, thoughtful, sentimental, sophisticated, visceral but also with its flaws. I wouldn't say it's Nolan's best work to date, but I daresay that this is one of the best science fiction ever released.

    After watching Interstellar, do yourself a favor and get lost in space and time and go back in time to see Contact (1997) and 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) to further wonder and wander into the realms of the unknown.

    Because sometimes it is the unknown that fascinates us, frightens us and brings out the best in us.
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