User Reviews (1,182)

  • Brands .18 February 2017
    10/10
    Logan is everything you wanted it to be and more
    Warning: Spoilers
    Logan is the 2017 movie everyone has been anticipating after two great trailers and a R rating it delivers a surprising amount of heart to characters we have grown to love and know and also balancing a surprising amount of action within the first and third act climax, its violent but not blood for blood sake every cut is with reason.

    Logan presents us with Logan (Wolverine), Professor X and Laura (X-23) and by definition its an escort mission involving X-23 but shes more capable than Logan and Professor X thinks and shes able to fend for herself. Logan is old and a grizzled shadow of what he once was and by going on this mission he unlocks some of the old wolverine inside of him and we see bursts of that throughout the movie, Logan also begins to realize things about himself through the vision of this little girl because they have striking similarities.

    Every scene in this film feels necessary from the character development to the humor and action nothing is forced everything comes off natural which is a breath of fresh air and I was very pleased with it, I believe that this movie will be very well received by fans as it treats its characters with such care and embarks on an emotional and satisfying conclusion to Hugh Jackmans Logan (Wolverine).
  • TheJediWay92 March 2017
    10/10
    Brutally violent, emotional, and character-driven, "Logan" is the Wolverine film fans have been waiting for
    Warning: Spoilers
    "Logan" is directed by James Mangold and stars Hugh Jackman for one final go around as Wolverine. With an R Rating secured, something the previous two Wolverine films should have had, "Logan" was bound to be fantastic. It wasn't fantastic. It was phenomenal.

    If you are going into "Logan" expecting every scene to just be Wolverine tearing people to shreds you'll be thoroughly disappointed. This is definitely not an action film. There are action sequences in the film, but they are not the main focus of the movie like the previous 2 Wolverine movies tried to make them be. "Logan" is a grounded film, a film that really takes its time to tell its story and to develop its characters. It's a character-driven film, and it probably has the most characterization in an X-Men film to date. We get enough of Wolverine's backstory within the first few minutes to really become attached to him (if we already weren't). We learn more about Professor X and what he has been doing, and then there's this little girl, who probably should be annoying, but luckily isn't and that was a sigh of relief. This girl, Laura, is the star of the show. It is really "her" movie. All of the sequences with Laura were riveting. There was that sense of mystery to her character that you wouldn't really expect from a film like this. You don't ever really know what her next move is going to be. Her motivation to find a safe haven is so well felt in this film that it just brings you a sigh of relief that there is still a sense of good out there in the world of this film where everything seems dark, bleak, and hopeless.

    Hugh Jackman's performance. Yeah the dude gave it his all. This is by far Hugh Jackman's best performance as Wolverine. We've never seen Wolverine this vulnerable. He's old, he's broken down, he's beaten. He can't heal like he used to. The conviction from Hugh Jackman in this movie was just spot on and really captured the ways Wolverine felt at certain moments. It added layers to this film. When Wolverine gets into a fight, Hugh Jackman is so good in these scenes it's like he got into a fight with the filmmakers on set.

    This film does not hold back from a violence standpoint. From the get go, you know what type of movie you are in for. It is brutally violent, by far the most violent X-Men film w have gotten. Wolverine hacks, claws, and slashes his way through skirmishes with blood, guts, and gore flying. If this is what you had always wanted from a Wolverine movie and haven't gotten it up to this point, well this movie gives you all of that.

    From a violence standpoint, the violence is there when the film calls for it. It is not violent for the sake of being violent. This is a film that puts its characters and story first before anything else, with violence being a secondary element to help propel the story along and to create tension. It is in the scenes where it should be. If this were just an all-out 2 hour and 20 minute "hack-and-slash" fest this film would have no depth to it. It would look cool, but giving Hugh Jackman the proper sendoff was what was more important in a film like this.

    This film at times gets downright emotional. The final scene of the film makes you wanna cry. You care about these characters, you are invested in them. You don't want to see them put in harm's way. Even in the scenes where the film may feel a bit slow, the final act of the film is the payoff. This is where everything really meshes together with a force, creating a pulse-pounding, edge of your seat final sendoff for Hugh Jackman as he retires from the role.

    This is by far the best Wolverine movie and possibly the best X-Men movie to date. I haven't decided yet. It's up there, and it deserves to be. Everything payed off in this film. It is emotional. It is character driven. It has heart. It is emotional. This is everything anyone could have wanted in a Wolverine film.

    From me "Logan" gets a perfect 10/10.
  • fung026 May 2017
    4/10
    Shallow, Tedious and Disappointing
    Warning: Spoilers
    The high ratings for this film are based entirely on its sombre tone. That's a great novelty in a 'superhero' movie, to be sure. But it merely masks the film's emptiness - its painful lack of ideas, lack of character development, and total absence of plot.

    Jackman's performance? As someone once quipped, his emotional range runs the full gamut... from A to B. He looks grumpy and depressed in every scene. In every shot. Patrick Stewart is somewhat more nuanced, though he too is hamstrung by a script that gives his character the emotional depth of a cartoon. Dafne Keen does a great job as Laura, but her character has only attitude - which incompetent screen writers often mistake for character.

    Visually, the film is bland. I hear there's a black-and-white version. It's always a bad sign when a film's creators can't make up their minds on such a key issue. A film is either shot for B&W, or it isn't. (In the case of Logan, the photography lacks the dramatic contrasts and strong composition that might favor a noir-ish B&W presentation.)

    Logic holes abound:

    * After being raised in a cage, Laura turns out to be a competent driver. What's more, she has no trouble reaching the pedals, presumably on account of some stretching power that's not mentioned elsewhere in the film.

    * Laura is mute for half the film, for no apparent reason. Then she can only speak Spanish. Then fluent English. No explanation.

    * Laura is often feral, as you'd expect of someone raised in a cage by sadistic scientists. Yet she acts like a normal child most of the time. Ditto for her friends. This quality does not 'develop' as a result of events in the film - it simply materializes when needed.

    * Laura drives at random, ends up at a completely out-of-the-way building. And meets all her friends. When was this arranged? How did she learn navigation while locked in a cage?

    * Logan and Laura have a cozy evening with a nice family - knowing full well that they're setting them up for slaughter, when their pursuers come along. The audience knows this instantly, characters in the film don't quite get it.

    * Logan is dying, we're never told why. Professor X has a brain-cloud, or some such dread condition, also not explained.

    Missed opportunities are equally plentiful:

    * Laura's feral attacks are mentioned in conversation, but never really discussed. Logan dismisses them with a couple of heavy one-liners, when they could have (and should have) led to an extended rumination on violence. The film doesn't miss a beat when Laura's friends brutally murder the guy with the mechanical hand. This lynch-mob logic should, again, have been a starting point for reflections that never happen in this shallow, trivial film.

    * Logan never has a character arc. Wolverine actually has far less emotional range in this film than in the first X-Men movie. His relationship with Laura is essentially the same as the far more developed relationship with Rogue.

    * Characters are neither built up, nor revealed. To do that, you have to show them in a range of different circumstances, dealing with emotionally or morally challenging dilemmas. In Logan, the only dilemma is how to keep eluding inexorable pursuit so as to stretch the film out past the two-hour mark. Hence the only character trait that can be revealed is dogged perseverance. We get that in the first scene. After that, nothing.

    * Ultimately, the filmmakers resort to having Logan shaved back to his familiar Wolverine muttonchops. You know you're in trouble when you're counting on facial hair to create characterization. (Or fan service.)

    * Plot is nonexistent. The film is one long chase. Weak screenwriters often mistake this for plot, but it's a poor substitute: totally linear, predictable, boring. Yes, there have been great 'chase' films (Sam Peckinpah's The Getaway comes to mind.) They take care to incorporate twists and turns, and strong moments of characterization. Logan doesn't. It's just a bunch of stuff that happens.

    On top of everything else, I had the creeping suspicion that this film was calculated less as a standalone work, than as a stepping-stone for the X-Men 'franchise.' It disposes of two performers who've stated their intent to depart the roles they created. And it seems to pave the way for the endlessly-discussed New Mutants franchise. Ugh. Replacing the people won't make up for a lack of ideas, and Logan shows very clearly how bereft of creative thinking the X-Men cinematic franchise has become.

    I didn't hate Logan as I was watching it. But when it ended I was overcome by a feeling of emptiness and disappointment. This film lacks both entertainment value and deep ideas. The Marvel cinematic universe badly needs a shot of new blood, but sadly, this wasn't it.
  • Calum Rhys3 March 2017
    A Gritty & Emotional Adventure Into The Vulnerability Of Superheroes
    Warning: Spoilers
    In a time when Marvel continues to churn out the same superhero film time- and-time again ('Deadpool' and 'Guardians' aside due to their fresh take on the genre), it's refreshing when something as intricate and beautifully- executed as 'Logan' is made. I mean let's face it, that first trailer was a dead giveaway of how damn good it was going to be.

    I understand that Marvel has made the attempt to build characters through a series of films previously, such as they have tried with the Avengers films, but never have I seen a film that treats character development as seriously, and pulls it off with such precision, as they did here in 'Logan', a film that focuses more on the "humane" aspect of the character and how vulnerable he is as a superhero, instead of the over-the-top execution that's usually featured ('X-Men Origins' I'm looking at you).

    Two characters that we've come to know and love, James "Wolverine" Howlett (aka Logan) and Charles "Professor X" Xavier, are put to the test of time as we see them in their new state, once characters that resembled strength and power, are now withering and vulnerable. And the gut-punching, adrenaline- pumping action has been swapped out for slow-moving, emotional drama and character development. Does it work? You bet! From start to finish we are led on a journey of discovery and empathy, with James Mangold more than making up for his previous effort that is 'The Wolverine'.

    I think it's the uncertainty throughout that gives the film that powerful punch. In the other X-Men films (and most other Marvel films for that), we are faced with a plethora of superheroes each fighting a seemingly impossible army, but no matter what, there is always a general feeling that the good guys will win, and this usually happens. So when attending a superhero film, you sit back in ease, knowing the protagonists will succeed, however in 'Logan' that never happens, there is never that sense of safety, we can't be certain of their outcomes. Every step of the way, Wolverine looks tired, he looks sick, he's dying gradually, and due to his weakened form, we are left worrying for the character, there is that emotional attachment that most other superhero films lack. This is the harrowing truth throughout, we are emotionally-concerned from start to finish.

    With utterly stunning cinematography, a hard-hitting score, fantastic direction and a superhero performance that might just be the first Oscar- deserving one ever. Wolverine's outing makes for the best Marvel film to date, a gritty and vulnerable adventure into the vulnerability of superheroes.
  • jcardella130 May 2017
    10/10
    The Best Wolverine Movie, Hands Down!
    This is a wolverine movie aimed at adults and definitely not for small children. The story is set in the future and Logan is taking care of Charles Xavier who has grown old and is incapable of taking care of himself. Logan, himself is now older and his health is slowly deteriorating as well. A young girl mutant enters their lives which sets off a story, which is not about super heroes fighting bad guys, but one that is on a more human level. "Logan", is a beautifully made X-Men film that deals with themes of importance of family, loyalty, and ultimately how Logan himself deals with new found emotions which he is experiencing for the very first time in his life.

    This is the crowning achievement in Hugh Jackman's role as Wolverine. It is the movie he and director, James Mangold had always wanted to make. It is a dramatic work of art and for X-Men fans, has plenty of action and special FX which are a definite cut above anything that has been seen before in Wolverine/X-Men films.

    A MUST SEE FOR ANY FAN AND A GOOD ENOUGH FILM TO STAND ALONE FOR ANYONE!!
  • trublu21523 February 2017
    10/10
    If there was ever a comic book movie deemed worthy of perfect, Logan is it.
    The word 'perfect' is very objective especially when it comes to film. While Logan may not be a perfect film, it is most certainly a perfect comic book film. It is a masterpiece of the most epic proportions and leaves us with a brilliant swan song for producer and star Hugh Jackman in his final outing as Wolverine. The film, directed brilliantly by James Mangold, is a two plus hour comic book fan's wet dream as we see the version of Wolverine every fan has wanted to see for nearly two decades. While many will be very sad to see Jackman step down from the role, he couldn't have picked a better or more satisfying film to end his cinematic legacy with.

    The film takes place in 2029 and shows the world in shambles. Mutants are nearly extinct, water is scarce and the world is just an overall wasteland. This is where we find Logan. He is a limo driving cantankerous caretaker to an even more cantankerous Professor X, who is now suffering from dementia and seizures. He is a borderline alcoholic suffering from a mysterious illness that limits his mutant abilities. Due to this, he lives this quiet life until he meets a young girl who he feels he must protect. Without giving too much away, there is much more here than I can go into but I will say, if you are a fan of the Wolverine comics, this film will bring a tear to your eye. This is probably the most faithful adaptation of a comic book character EVER, Marvel and DC combined. The way the story goes, the way Logan behaves, the selflessness and the rage, this is an all around realized version of this character. While it may have taken a little longer than it should have, this film was worth the wait. James Mangold does a fantastic job at creating the world Logan knows now. This is more of a film like Mangold's 3:10 to Yuma. It is bleak, violent and absolutely heartbreaking. This is far from the PG-13 character we're used to. This is a foul mouthed, miserable and very VERY bloody rendition of the source material. This is a film very much like The Guantlet or Badlands, a crime thriller and on-the-road drama. It very much embodies the look and feel of a film from the mid-70s and it plays to this very well.

    The performances in this film are amazing. Hugh Jackman's performance here is the best as the character and may be one of the best of his career. He is miserable and broken in this film and to see him like this as the character, it is bittersweet especially because Jackman has been so attached to this role. If he hurts, we hurt. If he's mad, we're mad. It is a true testament to Jackman as an actor to make his audience feel this connected to someone who is, by traditional standards, completely unrelateable. Boyd Holbrook brings a sinister performance to this and continues to build a very impressive resume. Holbrook is someone who you'll love to hate. The real standout performance here is from Dafne Keen who plays Laura. Without giving away any spoilers, she is BADASS in this film and even gives Logan a run for his money on the brutality.

    Overall, Logan is a perfect comic book adaptation that is as heartbreaking as it is visually stunning. Mangold and Jackman create a special film with this that should be talked about for years to come. Believe the hype, Logan is a seriously amazing comic book film that just may be the best ever made and embodies the definition of a perfect adaptation.
  • shawneofthedead1 March 2017
    9/10
    A fine, fitting farewell to an iconic character, LOGAN is one of the best superhero movies ever made.
    Warning: Spoilers
    Let's cut to the chase, shall we? In every beat, every frame, every moment, LOGAN feels like the Wolverine movie Hugh Jackman has been waiting (and training) for 17 years to make. Set free of a PG rating, this wildly kinetic film has plenty of gore, action and violence pumping through its veins. But what makes this one of the finest superhero movies ever produced is the big, messy, somewhat broken heart beating at its core.

    Set in a grim near-future where very few mutants remain alive, we meet an unthinkable incarnation of our favourite enclawed superhero: one who's decidedly past his prime. This is not the near-immortal Wolverine we remember, but Logan (Jackman): a broken, far older man who feels the weight of every wound inflicted upon him. His once- formidable body – tattooed with scars that aren't healing as fast or as well as they used to – seems to be failing. It's only his determination to keep the ailing, ageing Professor Charles Xavier (Stewart) safe and alive that never falters.

    The film's plot kicks into overdrive when Logan's fate becomes entangled with that of Laura (Keen), a close-to-feral young girl who brandishes claws and fury as fierce and lethal as Logan's own. As the unlikely trio go on the run, we see echoes of Logan himself in Laura's terrifying rage and the tentative emotional connection she forges with Xavier. It's one of many smart moves on the part of James Mangold, who does double duty as director and co-writer. Bringing Laura into the picture allows him to explore Logan's trauma, regret and hope through the filter of this pint-sized powerhouse's origin story.

    In effect, Mangold has placed an intimate family drama squarely at the heart of this ostensible blockbuster film – strip the characters of their superpowers and LOGAN would still pulse with plenty of heartbreak and humanity. Logan keeps dragging himself through the world when one suspects all he wants to do is die. Xavier grapples with his own frailty as his once-sharp mind deteriorates and betrays him, again and again. Laura is a tough, tender mess of contradictions: a victim of horrific abuse but also a warrior in the making. Watching them interact – fighting, screaming, arguing, glaring and, once in a while, forgiving – will elicit laughter and tears (lots of tears), in a way that no other superhero film to date has quire managed.

    That doesn't mean, however, that LOGAN is an entirely joyless, sombre affair. Far from it. It proves, quite conclusively, that films in this genre can plumb the darkest of psychological depths while finding welcome ways to leaven the misery. (Note: this is something Zack Snyder would do well to learn as he continues to expand DC's largely mirthless cinematic universe.) Mangold threads moments of genuine humour into the proceedings – from casual shoplifting and runaway horses, to an ornery old man who refuses to take his pills.

    The fast and furious action beats in LOGAN are also quite delightful to witness. The violence that's on full, bloody display is dark and horrible, but somehow fitting for this film in which there really are consequences for battles fought and lost. It's only when you see Logan's claws plunging into flesh, shearing cleanly through meat and bone, that you realise just how neutered and family-friendly his earlier outings were. There's a slow-motion sequence halfway through the film, as Logan struggles to get to an embattled Xavier, that's gritty and beautiful to watch – as thrilling as that scene-stealing Quicksilver moment in X-Men: Days Of Future Past. And it goes without saying that watching Laura gracefully spin and slice her way through oncoming attackers manages to be terribly wrong and wonderfully right at the same time.

    To be quite frank, none of this would work without the incredible cast, all of them doing award-worthy work that will, sadly, be overlooked because their characters have such silly things as 'powers'. It's truly unsettling to watch Stewart dig beneath his natural gravitas to find the shaken core of a Professor X who's semi-consciously losing grip of his mind – the best and most dangerous mind in the universe. Keen is a revelation. Grabbing this breakout role by the throat and making it very much her own, she somehow manages to convey Laura's childish fragility and overpowering strength, often in the same breath.

    And, finally, there's Jackman. He's been training for and playing the role that catapulted him to global stardom for 17 years now, and he brings everything he has to this final outing as Logan. He nails Logan's physical tics, of course: from his grizzled and aged demeanour, to his rattling cough and copious drinking. But Jackman also takes delight in unearthing the dark sadness at the heart of this once invincible, now vulnerable man. There is a hope and purity in Logan that doesn't always show through his wisecracks, but it shines brightly and unexpectedly here – often in the film's saddest moments.

    There are a handful of things about the film don't work quite so well. The main antagonists, played by Richard E. Grant and Boyd Holbrook, are largely forgettable – there's not much that defines them outside their nefarious goals. As many viewers may be turned off by Logan's relentless misery and eye-popping violence as those who welcome it.

    But this doesn't detract from the fact that LOGAN is a remarkable achievement. It manages to be several things at once: a bruising action film, a tender family drama and an intimate character study, liberally shaken through with comic-book sensibilities and a Western or two. If Jackman really is hanging up his claws for good, there could be no better way to bid farewell to one of Marvel's most enduring and appealing characters.
  • Andrew Wegerif20 May 2017
    1/10
    Just awful, does not deserve any of the praise.
    Warning: Spoilers
    Mindbogglingly bad film. I can't believe there are so many people saying lyrical things about it. Is this really what substitutes a good film in the year 2017? Come on.

    The story is just so stupid and totally full of holes, right from the get go. Scene 1: Logan is sleeping it off in his fancy limo when he is woken by some Latino guys that are trying to steal his rims. The car is jacked up and we clearly see them loosening the nuts of one of the tires. Logan slashes them up, removes the jack and then drives off real fast. Eh... what about that loose tire? And so on, stupidity after stupidity, through the whole film!

    There are people praising the characters. The characters, really? A bunch of morons completely and frustratingly unable to communicate with each other, unable to make any logical or reasonable decisions, and so utterly predictable. Charles constantly (more or less subtly) telling Logan that he is a stupid and unloved oaf, is that like peoples idea of cinematic tension between characters, showing profound depths of humanity? Seriously, tripe.

    And the action... I mean honestly, after like the 10th goon has had his eyes poked out by Logan or mini-girly-Spanish-I-can-suddenly-speak- English-where-the-h**l-did-I-learn-that-Logan it's not really that fascinating. Oh look, the spikes can come out through this side of the skull too, whey! Yes, a lot of people do get killed, slashed, maimed, decapitated, etc. in this film, but that does not make it great. Not by a long shot.

    There is seriously nothing great about this film. So just avoid it. Or watch it and waste a couple of hours of your life like I did of mine.
  • Her-Excellency17 March 2017
    4/10
    Such a sad farewell.
    Warning: Spoilers
    I really can't get how in the world people are rating this movie as highly as they are. You would think they have never seen this done, and done better.

    Yes, I understand that Logan is a heartfelt character dear to us, but THINK people! For that very same reason we should be holding this movie to a higher standard, and not giving it an emotional pass.

    To, me, this film was slow and depressing a-la No Country For Old Men, without ANY of the Oscar-worthiness. It was just droll, SUPER PREDICTABLE, moronic in its' execution and so very far-fetched. (Yes, imagine saying 'far-fetched' for a movie based on a comic)! They spun and bent a bunch of things to get them to where they were in the year 2029 and tried to make it believable (it wasn't). Then, they try to impress upon your heartstrings Logan's connection or ties to the little girl, but the connection or ties are SILLY at best.

    THEN, let me get this straight ... you are trying like hell to get away from the bad guys, and ummmmmm, you STOP FOR A MINI VACATION - not ONCE, but TWICE, and put hundreds of strangers in jeopardy the first time and a nice family in danger the second time. Seriously, anyone who could get over that gaping ridiculousness and who can, after that, in good conscience give this movie anything above a 6 is just messing with you or has total fan-boy blinders on.

    As for the little girl, god, she was annoying and aggravating AF and 90% of her screen time was spent shrieking. No, not screaming. SHRIEKING.

    The rest of the acting was good. The family they added as filler in the middle of the movie was the only thing IMO that you kind of cared about. Even old Professor X had seen better days and you kind of wanted it to be over for him. It was just painful to watch, and I don't mean in a moving way where the film is made better, but in a painful oh god, kill him off already way.

    *** BIG SPOILERS BELOW *** DO NOT READ IF YOU HAVE NOT SEEN THE MOVIE OR ARE PLANNING ON SEEING IT!!!

    The ending was unreal in how bad it was. Without giving too much away ... you have one little girl who is able to take out like 10-12 guys, PLUS Wolverine, PLUS a BUNCH of other mutant kids who have varying degrees of mutant abilities, and yet they can't take out a small group of bad guys?

    W T H ?

    As for Hugh Jackman, he was good and played Logan like he always has done except maybe this time he looked older and more tired which was a good thing because it translated unto the screen and gave Wolverine some credibility. Otherwise he was just there. The gushing over his acting this time around IMO is unwarranted, as he really didn't do anything that much different than he has on every other X-Men movie and if anyone disagrees, I defy them to point out what.

    All in all, I wasn't impressed.

    Don't get me wrong - it wasn't a horribly BAD movie, I just don't agree that it was any good and I really don't agree with the overrating or the assessment that it is in ANY way a "masterpiece". If you look at it just on paper, you would think that the people that are reacting to it in such a way have ONLY EVER watched comic-book movies in their lives and have now seen a drama sold as a comic-book movie and their brains are processing it as innovative and different.

    In closing, I understand that Hugh Jackman is getting older, and the great dilemma was 'how exactly do you keep making movies with an actor who is aging, playing a character who is supposed to rejuvenate or heal'? You don't. You kindly retire the character, as the creators of the franchise have chosen to do. The thing is, they could have really made it to where it wasn't SO depressing and/or bleak with no real outlook toward the future but a bunch of kids you aren't really invested in or care one iota about. A bad ending for a good character, was just bad cinema. RIP Logan.

    My actual rating is 7/10, but some reviewers have gone over the top crazy with the 10s.
  • zahmed_19703 April 2017
    4/10
    Horrible X-Men Movie period ...
    Warning: Spoilers
    I went in with an expectation of a "typical" X-Men movie, without reading the reviews here ... Just saw the "Star" ratings. I don't know who these people are give 10 stars, for sure either they had very a very low expectations from this or are paid raters. My problem with this movie is that you cannot take a total fictional Sci-Fi character and put him in a real life situation, where he is a beat up limo driver, fighting the Mexican thugs trying to steel his Limo's "Chrome plated rims" ... from the start I lost interest in it, after that it just drags, extra long scenes and not to mention that this movie happened in future, where all the mutants are gone/hunted down, yet no real advancements, people still shooting with 12 gauge shotguns ...There are No Mountain Range North Dakota bordering Canada .... Guys if you wanna make a movie about reality ... it should have some reality for a fictional Character ... It Just Sucked
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