Will Smith Poster

Quotes (37)

  • [on his first season of The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air (1990)] "I was trying so hard. I would memorize the entire script, then I'd be lipping everybody's lines while they were talking. When I watch those episodes, it's disgusting. My performances were horrible."
  • On the change in his body that Ali's intense physical training required: "I'm human viagra. I'm Willagra. I'm a sex machine now. I'm raring to go every second of the day. My wife's loving it."
  • My biggest emotional defeat and the greatest emotional pain I've had as an actor was when 'Wild Wild West' opened up to $52 million. The movie wasn't good. And it hurt so bad to be the No. 1 movie, to open at $52 million and to know the movie wasn't good.
  • I want to stop at five - when asked by Jules Asner about having more children.
  • When I turned 28, everything clicked. I even got way better in bed.
  • It's a whole different thing being an actor. A rapper is about being completely true to yourself. Being an actor is about changing who you are. You make yourself a different person. You become a different person.
  • You're so much stronger when your partner is strong. I honestly believe there is no woman for me but Jada. Of all the women I've met - and there've been a few - no one can handle me the way Jada does. Once you feel someone locked in on you, it's no contest. As fine as other women can be, as tempting sexually, I'm not going anywhere. This is it. I can't imagine what anyone else could offer.
  • I love being black in America, and especially being black in Hollywood.
  • I really believe that a man and a woman together, raising a family, is the purest form of happiness we can experience.
  • If you're not willing to work hard, let someone else do it. I'd rather be with someone who does a horrible job, but gives 110% than with someone who does a good job and gives 60%.
  • People laugh, but if I set my mind to it, within the next 15 years I would be president.
  • My grandmother once told me, 'Don't let failure go to your heart and don't let success go to your head.'
  • [on Star Wars (1977)] "I might have been eight or nine. That was the movie that put me into a space where the science fiction element was almost a spiritual connection for me. I thought, if someone could imagine that and then put it on a screen and make me feel like that... and my entire career I've been trying to make people feel like Star Wars (1977) made me feel."
  • About Aishwarya Rai Bachchan: "I really wanted to work with her in Hitch (2005) but she was shooting Bride & Prejudice (2004) at the time and she couldn't do it. She has this powerful energy where she doesn't have to say anything, do anything, she can just stand there. Anything she's making, I'll be there" (February 2006).
  • If I weren't a musician/actor, I'd be a computer engineer. I was always good at math. I probably would have been the guy who invented the remote control if I'd been around then.
  • When I started in movies, I said, 'I want to be the biggest movie star in the world.' The biggest movie stars make the biggest movies, so [my producing partner James Lassiter and I] looked at the top 10 movies of all time. At that point, they were all special-effects movies. So Independence Day (1996), no-brainer. Men in Black (1997), no-brainer. I, Robot (2004), no-brainer.
  • [on refusing to kiss Anthony Michael Hall in Six Degrees of Separation (1993)] It was very immature on my part. I was thinking, 'How are my friends in Philly going to think about this?' I wasn't emotionally stable enough to artistically commit to that aspect of the film. In a movie with actors and a director and writer of this caliber, for me to be the one bringing something cheesy to it... This was a valuable lesson for me. Either you do it or you don't.
  • Give me a problem, I'll give you a solution. I just love living. That's a feeling you can't fake. I'm glad every single day. I think that even the camera can feel that I'm a happy man.
  • (1996) I was nine and my older sister must have been 15. Some guys pulled a knife on me and took my money when I was coming home from school. I came in crying and my sister asked me why. I told her and she right away grabbed a baseball bat. We walked around for four hours looking for this guy. She had no concern for her own safety. Somebody had done something to her brother and she was going to do everything in her power to make sure they never did it again. We never found the guys, but that type of love and commitment is what I search for. My mother and my grandmother. That same kind of unconditional love. All women have the organs. But that's not what excites me about being in a relationship with women, that's not what makes me feel good. What I want to know is, 'Are you gonna grab a bat when someone steals my money?' Now, Miss Jada's so little, she might need two bats, but she's more than happy to go grab 'em. Outside of our love relationship, she's my best friend, too.
  • (1996, Movieline Magazine) There's probably only four women in Los Angeles that have intimate knowledge of Will Smith. You know, I had my brief period, a short time in my life, but that got real old real quick. I want to love somebody. I just always prefer one woman. The intimacy is so much more enjoyable when it's with someone you love. Because I know I can pretty much have sex with anyone I choose, it becomes less appealing. It's no challenge. A successful relationship is much harder than sleeping with as many women as you can sleep with.
  • (1996, on fame) There are members of the press who make their living infringing on people's private moments. You never know where these people are going to be. They stay outside your house and climb the gates and walk around looking in your windows. Now I've got a bunch of 140-pound Rottweilers. It's just a shame to have to live like that, because I like people so much. Still, you don't know what people will do. You can never feel completely safe. You've got to look around all the time. I'm kind of used to that, being black, watching out for white people coming to get you. Now it's tenfold...I'm having trouble dealing with the concept that you sacrifice your right to courtesy by being a celebrity. Because I'm a celebrity, someone is allowed to block my way from getting into my car. If I'm in the middle of a conversation, because I'm a celebrity, someone can come up to me and go, 'Can you sign this?' You're supposed to do the nice thing and sign, because if you don't, it's like, 'He's such an asshole. He doesn't sign autographs.' You're in mid-gulp at a restaurant and people ask you to put down your fork, take some dirty pen that you have no idea of where it's been, sign some filthy piece of paper ripped off a paper bag they found outside, then go back and put your hands in your food.
  • (1996, on fame) I'm pretty good at diffusing potential situations, but I find myself having to diffuse them a lot more often than before. I heard Sylvester Stallone say once that after he made Rocky (1976), everybody wanted to fight him. Well, every big guy wants to fight me now. They go. 'Yo. I ain't no alien-hit me,' and I'm like, 'I don't want to hit you. I just want to get some cheese from the supermarket to make grilled cheese sandwiches for my son.' Why do people want to fight me? What did I do? I think of myself as a pretty calm, likable guy. It's really weird. I was nonthreatening on 'The Fresh Prince,' so nobody wanted to fight me, but then I buffed up for Independence Day, came on a little cocky, and suddenly people want to knock me down. People who know me from TV think I've seen them in their underwear drinking on their couch, so the response is more familiar, more friendly. Film gives you almost God status, you know? It makes people crazy.
  • (1996, on fame) I was in Manhattan making Men in Black (1997) and this girl was driving along, saw me and started mouthing over and over, 'Oh, my God. Oh, my God,' then crashed into another car." Smith shakes his head in amazement. "Now, she gets out of her car, but she doesn't say, "Oh. I crashed into the back of a car!' She runs over to me and asks for my autograph. That's when I thought: This is real different. Then, I was at the Virgin Megastore in Manhattan and this girl came up to me, pulled her shirt up and asked me to sign her breasts with a Sharpie. I mean, she's standing there in the middle of the store with her titties hanging out and I'm like, 'Listen, those are really nice breasts, but this is really an inappropriate time and place.' In another store, this toothless 80-year-old lady came up to me, grabbed my face and tried to kiss me right on the lips. I said, 'Now, ma'am, if I walked up to you, grabbed your face and tried to kiss you on the mouth, the cops would give me a Rodney King and take me right to jail.' And she was like, 'Oh, slop being mean. Just give me a kiss.'
  • (1996) As for my life right now, the picture I always see in my mind is of that incredible game Michael Jordan had where he had 63 points. He just turned to the TV cameras and shrugged, like, 'Hey, I'm just throwing 'em up there and they're going in.' That's how I feel. I'd love to say that I'm brilliant, that I'm the second coming. The real answer is that I'm blessed. I throw 'em up from wherever I am and they just keep going in. How cool is that?
  • (1996) I'm above average in talent, but where I think I excel is psychotic drive. All I need is for somebody to say I can't do something and this crazy switch inside me makes me attack whatever I'm doing. Psychotic drive is where I excel over people that are probably more naturally gifted.
  • (1996) In film and TV, there's a natural, gradual decline to your career. In the music business, it's literally one day. The day your record hits the radio, you explode to number one on the countdown. You're the man, you're large, you're doing show after show. Then you're over just that fast. I had the ups of people telling me, 'You're the man, Will.' then the downs of selling your house because you can't afford all this stuff you bought because everybody told you were the man. The money disappeared. But, my God, I learned about myself because I had the ups and all the downs...I've been in really ugly situations, hostage situations, on the road with my music. You know, you get out to Albany, Georgia and the promoter didn't make his money, so he doesn't want to pay you. I mean, during the first part of my music career, we signed our first deal with a gangster who later tried to shoot us. He was a penny-ante gangster, but the bullets were for real. As we were driving away, he shot at the car five or six times. It was pretty scary, but you don't think about that while it's happening, you're just trying to get away. He would have killed us if he could actually shoot.
  • [on turning down the lead role in The Matrix (1999)] You know, _The Matrix_ is a difficult concept to pitch. In the pitch, I just didn't see it. I watched Keanu's performance - and very rarely do I say this - but I would have messed it up. I would have absolutely messed up The Matrix (1999). At that point I wasn't smart enough as an actor to let the movie be. Whereas Keanu was smart enough to just let it be. Let the movie and the director tell the story, and don't try and perform every moment.
  • As a child I watched 'Dallas', and that was the vision for my life as long as I can remember. The property had a name! It was called 'Southfork'. How does a property have a name? Ours was just 'Row House'.
  • [on passing on the role of Django in Django Unchained (2012)] Django wasn't the lead, so it was like, I need to be the lead. The other character was the lead! I was like, 'No, Quentin, please, I need to kill the bad guy!' I thought it was brilliant. Just not for me.
  • [on Justin Bieber] I talk to Justin once a week, and he is suffering from immature adulthood in the media and surrounding world. He's not doing anything that a normal nineteen-year-old wouldn't want to do and wouldn't need to do to become a man. The transition from boyhood to manhood is a very difficult transition that he's handling on a world stage better than 95 percent of the people who talk shit about him.
  • I love to create. There's something about making movies that just really gets me excited. It's not the movie-making probably as much as the storytelling. I love people being wrapped in a story and being able to deliver that emotional punch line at the end of the story.
  • [in an interview for After Earth (2013) talking about what scares him the most in cinema] It's been an absolute necessity that the movie be a blockbuster, but I think I'm going to start moving out of that and finding more danger in my artistic choices.
  • Being realistic is the most commonly traveled road to mediocrity.
  • [Why he and his wife are boycotting the Oscars] When I look at it, the nominations reflect The Academy. The Academy reflects the industry and the industry reflects Hollywood and America. America reflects a series of challenges that we are having in our country at the moment which are on a regressive slide we are having towards separatism, towards racial and religious disharmony and that's not the Hollywood and the America I want to leave behind.
  • [on making Wild Wild West (1999)] I wanted to win and be the biggest movie star, and what happened was there was a lag around Wild Wild West (1999) at the time. I found myself promoting something because I wanted to win versus promoting something because I believed in it. It's now in the hand of fans. I have to be in tune with their needs and not trick them into going to see Wild Wild West.
  • [on making Wild Wild West] We went out on a limb with a couple of these scenes. I sure hope people think this is funny, because this is one of those setups that can either be hilarious or it can be something people will hate for the rest of their lives...We'll see on Big Willie Weekend what people think.
  • [on why he decided to make Wild Wild West] The first time where it didn't work the way that I wanted was Wild Wild West. I was coming off of Men in Black, and everything was like, 'Oh, we can't lose,' you know? I was like, 'Oh! Tragedy!'... With a movie, it's like you never know; you can love it, you can have done what you think is the best work you've ever done, and you put it out on that Friday, and everybody hates it - and you've taken a year.