George A. Romero Poster

Quotes (17)

  • If I fail, they [the film industry] write me off as another statistic. If I succeed, they pay me a million bucks to fly out to Hollywood and fart.
  • [on his fourth installment of the "Living Dead" series, Land of the Dead (2005)] The idea of living with terrorism--I've tried to make it more applicable to the concerns Americans are going through now.
  • If one horror film hits, everyone says, "Let's go make a horror film!" It's the genre that never dies.
  • If you have 60 people dress like zombies and you show them something that you like, you get 60 people doing the exact same thing. My opinion of a good zombie walk is to loll your head as if it's a little too heavy and the muscles have begun to atrophy.
  • I'm like my zombies. I won't stay dead!
  • My zombie films have been so far apart that I've been able to reflect the socio-political climates of the different decades. I have this conceit that they're a little bit of a chronicle, a cinematic diary of what's going on.
  • I'll never live long enough to arrive at some sort of peaceful co-existence of some kind. That's probably the only way you could end it on a note of promise, which would mean the zombies would learn how to eat Spam or chicken livers, instead of your liver. But I'll never get to that point.
  • Yeah, I'm seen by the studios as a genre guy. I've made several non-genre films, but nobody went to see them. I guess I'll never be a member of that club.
  • I'll never get sick of zombies. I just get sick of producers.
  • Just because I'm showing somebody being disemboweled doesn't mean I have to get heavy and put a message around it.
  • I don't try to answer any questions or preach. My personality and my opinions come through in the satire of the films, but I think of them as a snapshot of the time. I have this device, or conceit, where something happens in the world and I can say, "Ooo, I'll talk about that, and I can throw zombies in it! And get it made!" You know, it's kind of my ticket to ride.
  • I guess in my pictures you're either doomed or you've got yourself a hell of a job.
  • I don't think you need to spend $40 million to be creepy. The best horror films are the ones that are much less endowed.
  • I always thought of the zombies as being about revolution, one generation consuming the next.
  • [on Night of the Living Dead (1968)] At first I didn't think of them as zombies, I thought of them as flesh-eaters or ghouls and never called them zombies in the first film. Then people started to write about them, calling them zombies, and all of a sudden that's what they were: the new zombies. I guess I invented a few rules, like kill the brain and you kill the ghoul, and eventually I surrendered to the idea and called them zombies in Dawn of the Dead (1978), but it was never that important to me what they were. Just that they existed.
  • [on The Tales of Hoffmann (1951)] It was the filmmaking, the fantasy, the fact that it was a fantasy and it had a few frightening, sort of bizarre things in it. It was everything. It was really a movie for me, and it gave me an early appreciation for the power of visual media--the fact that you could experiment with it. He [Michael Powell] was doing all his tricks in-camera, and they were sort of obvious. That made me feel that, gee, maybe I could figure this medium out. It was transparent, but it worked.
  • People say, well, what underlies this film is a satire about consumerism. Underlies?? I mean, God, it's like a pie in your face, it's just way up front. And I thought when I made the film, God, I went a little too far, I mean, this is too obvious. And yet, you know, people dig it, the high kicks, it's always the Rockettes that get the applause.