Fish Poster

Quotes (35)

  • I've got used to signing autographs for 13 year old Kayleighs.
  • Going through parks listening to Joni Mitchell, Lavender is the little boy's dream about you can walk through the park and bump into the lady of your dreams that you're going to fall instantaneously in love with.
  • 'Kayleigh' was a way of saying sorry. I had a lot of relationships that basically I'd wrecked because I was obsessed with the career and where I wanted to go. I was very, very selfish and I just wanted to be the famous singer but I was starting to become aware of the sacrifices that I was making, and I think that Kay was one of those sacrifices. 'Kayleigh' was not just about one person; it was about three or four different people. The 'stilettos in the snow' was something that happened in Galashiels, when I can remember we were both really drunk and, you know, dancing under a street light, and 'dawn escapes from moonwashed college halls' was part of the Cambridge thing.
  • There came a lot of pressure upon us. They wanted Kayleigh part II. Because Misplaced Childhood was a big album. And Clutching at Straws had not sold quite as many as Misplaced. And everybody wanted us to break America. I just feel a bit uncomfortable when I am under pressure like that.
  • I can't get any coverage. I'm over 25 years old, bald, a stone overweight and therefore I'm not relevant. We are getting airplay all over mainland Europe, but I can't get played in the island I come from with my own native language.
  • You get infected with the cynicism, the negativity, and the apathy that exists in Britain. It's really starting to get to me now.
  • At 21 I wanted the fame, but what does fame give you? You get the best table at the restaurant, but there are more waiters hanging around looking for bigger tips.
  • Who writes when they are happy? If you are really happy, having a magical night making love by the side of a Swiss lake you don't stop midway through and say: 'excuse me, I'm feeling so happy I have to stop and write a lyric'. You wait until the whole thing falls apart and then you think back to what it was like.
  • What I find really disgusting is that the most powerful comment on the Falklands War, Pink Floyd's The Final Cut, didn't reach as many people as it should have. You know why? Because everybody was told it was so unhip to like anything by the Floyd.
  • When you start in a band you're comparing yourself to other bands, 'they sell so many more records' and the rest of it, but after your first or second album all you're concerned with is basically your own creativity, your own tours. I mean obviously you take an interest in what other people are doing but you just chart your own path.
  • I saw Duran Duran in their heyday and they blew me away. They were genuine stars with great music and a great production.
  • I really enjoy making music, but I think that when it gets to a certain commercial level it just becomes far less enjoyable.
  • One of the problems nowadays is that in the corporate music environment that we live in, people don't want to get involved in politics or controversial issues because it might lead to a loss in sales.
  • [speaking in 2003] The people who are buying chart records are kids, and I am not talking about teenagers.
  • By 1987 we were over-playing live because the manager was on 20 per cent of the gross. He was making a fantastic amount of money while we were working our asses off. Then I found a bit of paper proposing an American tour. At the end of the day the band would have needed a £14,000 loan from EMI as tour support to do it. That was when I knew that, if I stayed with the band, I'd probably end up a raging alcoholic and be found overdosed and dying in a big house in Oxford with Irish wolfhounds at the bottom of my bed.
  • In all honesty, I am 50 years old, I smoke, drink, have a 'colourful' history, have sung at nearly 1,700 gigs over 27 years and have conducted three times as many interviews. It's like standing on the M1 and expecting not to be hit by a car.
  • It's a rapidly changing music business these days and I don't really feel I belong to it. I just do my own thing and am grateful that I have a highly supportive fan base who have followed me for a long time and enable me to continue to make albums.
  • I like the idea of the internet and it has most definitely meant that I have been able to continue my career in an alternative way to the old record company set ups. However the double edged sword is that this freedom is available to all including those that make albums that should never see the light of day!
  • Making an album is the easiest part. The difficulty is getting your music heard and promoting your material into the wider world. And that's more difficult and more expensive than ever. Having a Facebook/ Myspace/ web site doesn't mean everyone visits it! You still have to promote it in the big world.
  • The thing with demo tapes and the continual experience in studios and examining your writing is that the crap would be filtered out and through advice, criticism and self examination you could maybe create a piece of gold. Now you just buy a few hundred pounds worth of computer software, get a few of your musician mates around and hey presto! you have an album to press!
  • It is so easy to make music and albums these days and there are far too many that should never be made. There are too many bands and musicians that forget to switch on the bullshit filters in the studio. It's resulted in a lot of substandard and mediocre albums all vying for attention and saturating the market and making it more difficult for people to discover the gems.
  • As much as I like Peter's (Peter Gabriel) work and having met him a few times over the years the idea of a collaboration wouldn't work. Personality wise we are very different and I think I may be too "loud" for him! He prefers to work with more "left field" performers and having experienced working with Peter Hammill on his "House of Usher" project in the early stages, having two vocals that sound "similar" doesn't work as well as you may think. Saying that I don't really think we are that similar these days. Perhaps in the early 80's but not now. Hairstyles yes! Vocally no!
  • I left the band after 7 years and 4 great studio albums with no regrets and a sense of pride and accomplishment.
  • [speaking in 1984] We're not really a fashion band. We're not a chart band, we're very much an albums band, and I think because you could say the style that Marillion play transcends a lot of different types of styles, it upsets people because they can't categorise us.
  • 'Incubus' is probably my all time favourite from my seven years with the band.
  • I am 1.95 mtrs tall. They go "Ah, we know what you can play, we have this big killer who goes about beating people up. You are 6 foot 5, you are Scottish. You are a drunk or you are a criminal". Stereotyped! I am a nice guy.
  • Tara is very independent and never uses my name to open doors. She has done it all herself and now she is more popular than me. I took her to see Queen when she was about 16, we were sat around a table with Brian May and Roger Taylor and she wasn't fazed at all. In fact they were fascinated by her and she is going to the Guns N' Roses concert backstage and I haven't even been asked.
  • I was wary of being drawn to someone in the industry. But I've been in the situation before where I've gone out with people not involved in music and they've not understood my career.
  • The business has changed so much and I would hate to be in a young band trying to start out now. The demand to compromise is very high.
  • It will come as no surprise to fans of my music, and to most people who know me, that I have been an advocate for independence for a very long time and as such my views have not changed in recent months. I have listened to the debates and arguments with interest and an open mind and have considered both sides of the equations on offer. I personally believe that Scotland as a nation can make it on its own, although I do not envisage it being an easy ride in the formative years.
  • With a real name of Derek William Dick, it became very necessary to find a nickname as quickly as possible.
  • [on Scottish independence] I've got my own personal feelings on it but I live up here and I've lived up here since 1988, so sometimes I'll object a little bit to some of the celebrities that are going all out, "Better Together" - it's like, "You don't live up here". Having Mick Jagger and David Bowie turn round and say "Oh it's better together", I don't even think they pay the majority of their taxes in this country.
  • I've got a lot of socialist trends, but I work in a capitalist industry.
  • I think Paul Weller's as much influenced by Pete Townshend as we're influenced by Genesis.
  • I love "Misplaced Childhood" because it brought us success, but the album also signaled the end of the band as it brought a lot of collisions and conflict. We were playing in the Premier League and we were finding it hard keeping it together.