Rosamund Pike Poster

Quotes (15)

  • Filming Pride & Prejudice (2005) was a joy and made for one of my happiest summers ever. "It could well be that the story brings out the best in people - and it sounds so cheesy, but we really did behave like a family. The girls playing the younger sisters had never been on a film set before and wanted to socialize all the time, so we picnicked, hung out in a beautiful country house and went swimming naked in a lake. It was idyllic.
  • I don't think RADA wanted me, actually. When I was at Oxford I had a boyfriend at Central [School of Speech and Drama] and it looked like the most fantastic life, but I think not going makes you more free. Nothing can teach you what it's like to work on a film set, and the best education there can be for an actor is to walk up the street and observe human nature.
  • When you're dressed up like Miranda Frost [from Die Another Day (2002)], people assume you have a similar character, but I was 21 and quaking inside.
  • I think you can make a choice with that kind of thing. You can certainly keep a low public profile if you want to. Ideally, I'd like to be living in upstate New York, in a house that I could renovate and fill with books and clothes, while being offered the kind of parts that are currently going to Kate Winslet and Nicole Kidman.
  • I think it's OK to play to your strengths, and if I have a quality of Englishness that people like, I won't hide that. I'm probably not going to play a junkie and that's OK because there are other people who will do it better. A view that's been held for a long time is that the best way to prove oneself as an actor is to play the grittiest roles out there. I don't agree with that.
  • I'd love to say I was the kind of person who has an outline. But the only outline I have is that I want to carry on doing this all my life.
  • [on the direction from Joe Wright in Pride & Prejudice (2005)] You can get quite self-conscious at times, there's this business of your close-up coming up but, in that big ball scene, he put three cameras on it. And in lots of the dinner scenes too, so you wouldn't actually know when your moment was coming. That's why it's got that lovely unaware quality to it, you really did feel it's being observed. I think it's because people didn't know they were being watched really, that's what you get, this window on life.
  • Daniel Day-Lewis in In the Name of the Father (1993) was the first performance that made me think about how incredible acting is. It made me realise the power of film and that this medium could have a physical reaction on me and I hadn't really experienced that before. I come from a theatrical family and grew up around stage, so film-going was not really part of my life. But I remember going to see this film and being riveted by the story and the performances. I found it sexy and believable; it took me into another world. I was in floods of tears at the end of it.
  • [on writer-director Christopher McQuarrie's film, Jack Reacher (2012)] He is such a great writer, he manages to give you all the satisfaction of a love affair without [the characters] ever actually touched. In a way, I started to think that maybe sex scenes are what people put on when there isn't any chemistry.
  • [on Johnny Depp] He's so brilliant to work with, so exciting, you believe in him so much as a character. It made my job very easy. He's like the coolest kid in school. You want to be in his gang. His whole lifestyle is kind of wonderful. He travels with this big group of people. He's like a gypsy. His caravan is always filled with his friends, playing guitar and painting. You want to be in the band. The guys who look after the trailers were like, 'How do we clean in there?' because he covered it with drapes and candles, just covered every available surface.
  • [on Johnny Depp] -- He is the most amazing actor I've ever worked with. I felt very, very free with him. We had some very traumatic, violent scenes in which the director wanted us to push everything to the limit. I felt sick with worry the morning of shooting. I guess I drew on all the experiences of love I'd ever had. There were no rehearsals. It was very exciting.
  • [on David Graham] He's so charming. I love working with him. The bond between Parker and Penelope - plus the humour that is batted between them - is really fun to play. David is a gentleman and I am extremely fond of him.
  • [on David Fincher's suggestion that she use Carolyn Bessette-Kennedy as a model for Amy Dunne in Gone Girl (2014)] I ordered old copies of the Vanity Fair in which she appeared on the cover. I scoured the internet for any footage of her or, even better, any interviews or recordings which captured her voice. And I realized that David had basically given me a cipher to study. There are countless photographs of Bessette: gorgeous portraits in Vanity Fair; vibrant, intimate photographs taken of Bessette and Kennedy engrossed in each other at parties; shots of her walking the New York streets, wrapping herself in cashmere as protection against the cold and probably photographers, head down, her long blond hair shielding her face from full view. There are even a fair few shots of her and Kennedy clearly in the midst of blistering rows in Central Park, in the street, but I could find nothing of her in her own words. And I thought, Well, maybe that's fine. Amy, as she wants to be seen, should be created from outside in. I tried to find a way to own that body language, the self-protective seductiveness, head down, hair falling....I couldn't really read her face, and so I tried to use that quality. You meet Amy, she smiles, but her eyes are always scanning you, assessing, seeing if you can play the game, surprised and pleased when you score a point, feeling that you might after all be worthwhile. It is not a relaxing way to live.
  • [Oscar night] The grand finale.
  • I don't smoke so I was able to come within a hundred metres of him [Donald Sutherland], which most people on set couldn't because of the smoking ban - no one can smoke within a hundred metres of him.