Biography

Of all the very talented and capable directors to work on the two Alfred Hitchcock television series, Robert Stevens was the only one ever honored with the Emmy Award. His skill behind the camera, also honored by a DGA nomination in 1957, was one of the major influences on the half-hour Hitchcock show. His work with Hitchcock, and his previous work directing and producing an early television classic, Suspense (1949) (adapted from the long-running radio series), were just two of the high-water marks in a memorable career as a film and television director. A friend of then-CBS executive William Dozier, Stevens directed two of the earliest The Twilight Zone (1959) episodes: The Twilight Zone: Where Is Everybody? (1959) (the pilot which sold the series) and the fondly remembered The Twilight Zone: Walking Distance (1959).

Stevens worked far less after 1970 than he had before, and was referred to as a "television writer" by The Associated Press upon his death of cardiac arrest in 1989, after he had been beaten and robbed at a rented home in Westport, Connecticut.