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The Claustrophobic Cinema of Paul (W.S.) Anderson

The old Hollywood studio-hand W.S. Van Dyke -- who directed, amongst countless other things, "The Thin Man" -- once advised a young Orson Welles to "just keep it close, and keep it moving." And an unlikely inheritor of this wisdom is Paul W.S. Anderson, whose latest work to hit screens is this week's "Pandorum," which he executive produced, leaving the directing to German up-and-comer Christian Alvart. Rivaled only by Uwe Boll for the title of worst-reviewed director of the past decade, Anderson's also been one of the most resourceful. Working with the flimsiest material (video game adaptations and remakes) in the least respectable of genres (sci-fi, horror), he's managed to construct a remarkably coherent body of work. With his longtime producer Jeremy Bolt and a loose coterie of actors, he's created a series of films that focus on the expressiveness of claustrophobic spaces and the physical grace of his (mainly) female protagonists.

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