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‘The Happy Prince’ Review: Oscar Wilde Is a Depressed Loner in Rupert Everett’s Humorless Biopic — Sundance 2018

‘The Happy Prince’ Review: Oscar Wilde Is a Depressed Loner in Rupert Everett’s Humorless Biopic — Sundance 2018

Most people know Oscar Wilde as the preeminent source of British wit, a high-society raconteur whose plays and novels epitomize what it means to be the life of the party. That characterization recedes to the shadows in “The Happy Prince,” in which Rupert Everett directs and stars as the flamboyant literary giant at the end of his life. Anyone expecting Wildean banter will be sorely disappointed — think more of an autobiographical spin on “The Portrait of Dorian Gray” than “The Importance of Being Earnest” — but it’s Everett’s formidable investment in the role that rescues the movie from being a total letdown. Nevertheless, “The Happy Prince” largely amounts to a bland rumination on Wilde’s lesser-known decline.

Read More:The 2018 IndieWire Sundance Bible: Every Review, Interview, and News Item Posted During the Festival

The drama mostly takes place in 1867, shortly after Wilde was released from prison for “indecency with men.

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