News

Berlin Profiles: Lars Kraume, Director of ‘The Silent Revolution’

Berlin Profiles: Lars Kraume, Director of ‘The Silent Revolution’

Lars Kraume revisits postwar German history in “The Silent Revolution,” a story of idealistic young pupils in East Germany who, in 1956, unite in solidarity to honor the victims of the Hungarian uprising against the country’s communist regime and Soviet military.

Based on real events, the story is set around the same time as Kraume’s last theatrical feature, “The People vs. Fritz Bauer,” about the West German prosecutor who was instrumental in the capture of Nazi war criminal Adolf Eichmann — a film that went on to sweep the German Film Awards in 2016.

The Silent Revolution,” which screens in Berlinale Special Gala, similarly focuses on protagonists with unwavering moral convictions and the courage to take a stand.

Described as “Dead Poets Society” meets “The Lives of Others,” the film is based on Dietrich Garstka’s novel of the same name in which the author recounts his own experiences and those of his 18 classmates.

The story of

See full article on Variety - Film News