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Art, Commerce Find Common Ground in Russia

Art, Commerce Find Common Ground in Russia

While Kantemir Balagov’s “Beanpole” and Larisa Sadilova’s “Once in Trubchevsk,” both screening in Un Certain Regard, fly the flag for Russian arthouse filmmaking at the Cannes Film Festival this year, the Russian pics in the market reflect the wide diversity of genres being produced in the country.

The 27-year-old Balagov took a Fipresci prize in the same section at Cannes in 2017 for his feature debut “Closeness,” a ’90s-set story of a small-town kidnapping. With the film, Balagov, a protégé of Alexander Sokurov, established a reputation for thoughtful, atmospheric studies of complex characters facing dire struggles.

His second feature, produced by Alexander Rodnyansky, the man behind Andrey Zvyagintsev’s Oscar-nominated films “Leviathan” and “Loveless,” is the tale of two female soldiers looking for hope and meaning in the aftermath of the WWII siege of Leningrad.

The film, being sold by Wild Bunch, offers a more nuanced look at war

See full article on Variety