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‘Kubrick by Kubrick’: Tribeca Film Review

‘Kubrick by Kubrick’: Tribeca Film Review

In the last 10 years, there’s been an ever-widening niche of documentaries about Stanley Kubrick. Every one of them has been fascinating, one or two (like “Stanley Kubrick’s Boxes”) are as idiosyncratic as the director himself, and the most artful and memorable — “Filmworker” (2017), a portrait of Kubrick’s monkishly devoted gofer and right-hand assistant, Leon Vitali — is an essential artifact. Amid the steady outpouring of Kubrickiana, the 72-minute-long “Kubrick by Kubrick” may be the least exotic, but it still gives any Kubrick believer a heady share of morsels to chew on.

The film is built around a series of tape-recorded interviews that Michel Ciment, the French film critic and editor of Positif, conducted with Kubrick over the course of 20 years. In 1968, Ciment wrote the first major overview of Kubrick’s work to appear in France, and the director got in touch with him. Kubrick, from that point on, virtually never gave interviews.

See full article on Variety