News
Top News

‘Yellow Rose’ Film Review: A Young Immigrant Finds Her Voice in Routine Indie

‘Yellow Rose’ Film Review: A Young Immigrant Finds Her Voice in Routine Indie

There’s no faulting “Yellow Rose” for its good intentions, but this tale of a young Filipina teen finding her voice as a country artist (while dealing with her immigration status) almost always feels like it’s skimming the surface of a deeper story.

Documentary director Diane Paragas makes her debut as a fiction filmmaker, and while she and cinematographer August Thurmer certainly achieve verisimilitude in their Texas locations — the flatness of Bastrop, the city lights of Austin, the bright stage of a honky-tonk — the screenplay by Paragas, Annie Howell (“Claire in Motion”), and Celena Cipriaso tells the story in the broadest strokes possible, and the lack of specificity undercuts the film’s impact.

High-schooler Rose (Broadway performer Eva Noblezada) lives in a Bastrop motel, where her widowed mother Priscilla (Princess Punzalan) works as a housekeeper. Priscilla lovingly and strictly tries to keep an eye on Rose’s whereabouts, since both are without legal documentation,

See full article on The Wrap