News
Top News

The Real Thing Review: Kôji Fukada Delivers a Four-Hour Astonishment

The Real Thing Review: Kôji Fukada Delivers a Four-Hour Astonishment

Movies are the best liars money can buy, and the notion of love at first sight might be their greatest fib. Blame the effortless charmers of Classic Hollywood who perfected flirtatious glances, knowing smiles, and batting of the eyes in order to con us into thinking their lives could be ours. What these fantasies ultimately tell us is that new romance could (and should) lead to salvation, the hope for a happy life that settles in nicely with societal expectations.

With its massive runtime, circular story, and repetitive depiction of self-destructiveness, Kôji Fukada’s The Real Thing is the very antithesis to the classic meet-cute scenario. Based on Mochiru Hoshisato’s graphic novel, it was originally produced for Japanese television. The film has been slightly trimmed and spliced together for theatrical audiences at a still-hefty 232 minutes. Thus some of the eccentric charm that made it such a masterpiece of the serial format has vanished.

See full article on The Film Stage