Review

  • Maybe I missed some quick reference in the dialogue, but I'm not exactly sure where or when this film is set, although I'd say in South Africa circa 1900 or so. With George Sanders and his British accent and Ty Hardin and his American accent, I'm not sure exactly what colonial authority these men represent, but I'm probably asking too many questions for a film of this type. Just go with the flow and enjoy... With that attitude in mind, I'd have to say this is a somewhat interesting western-structured film, but transferred to a South African setting. Substitute the indigenous black characters for American Indians, and the South African desert for Arizona; also, give the film a somewhat slower pace so we can soak up the locale and atmosphere; the end result is ONE STEP TO HELL. Both George Sanders and Rosanno Brazzi give the film some class, but both have a limited number of scenes. Pier Angeli adds some depth to the film, although Helga Line is not given much of a role. A veteran of both westerns and war films, Ty Hardin can make himself look convincing toting a gun in any setting, and his female fans can catch him with no shirt on in a few scenes (see my review of MAN OF THE CURSED VALLEY). The distinctive setting and particulars make this film somewhat interesting, but I wouldn't go to any great effort to find a copy. By the way, Ty Hardin's character introduces himself a few times as King Edwards, not King Ray.