• I like films which depict real-life events, and this was among the better ones because it didn't hold back. The film is told from the viewpoint of a Latina high-school student, Paula, in a predominantly-Mexican part of Los Angeles in 1968. She falls in with a radical group known as the Brown Berets, headed by an anti-establishment teacher, who are dedicated to fighting for equal treatment in the schools where Latino students were subjected to spankings, assigned janitor duty for minor offenses such as being late to class, denied restroom access and not being allowed to express cultural pride, i.e. speak Spanish. It seemed like to schools tried to sweep them under the rug, but this group was smart enough to know that the schools needed them to maintain economic funding, so they decide to protest by coming to school one day, then leaving as soon as class begins. The police became involved, and it showed that these students were indeed second-class citizens. I wasn't alive yet when this actually occurred, but I have no doubt that the police brutality was as real as depicted. I wonder if Edward James Olmos was among those involved or if he knows those who were. It was a good idea to make this a cable project instead of a feature film because they often distort details of actual events to make them more marketable. I also give props to a portrayal of Latinos which shows them as intelligent rather than focusing on negative stereotypes.