Review

  • For those of us raised on George Reeves, Christopher Reeve, or "Batman: The Animated Series," "Justice League" (or its latest incarnation, "Justice League Unlimited") is a god-send. It is a show that combines superhero daring-do with some witty dialog, intriguing story lines, and superb character interaction that is much more "adult" than most of the fare on Cartoon Network's prime time lineup.

    Now in its fifth (and final) year, "Justice League," though often pitting the superheroes against invading aliens or super-villains bent on world destruction, has taken some departures from the typical cartoon by presenting some interesting romantic relationships between principal characters: the not-so-subtle romance between Green Lantern and Hawkgirl and the implied attraction between Wonder Woman and Batman. There has also been some rift between the heroes, on occasion between Batman and Superman. Like Superman, the Martian Manhunter has to deal with the loss of his home world and the death of his beloved and children. The Flash is along as the comic relief, as a superhero with a strong libido, always on the "hunt" for a female conquest.

    The writers get to show more of the human side of those that are considered "super". Even Superman got to show a little emotion when confronted with longtime enemy Darkseid" in the two-parter "Twilight". The Man of Steel would've murdered the villain if Batman had not intervened. In an episode about a parallel universe, the Superman of that world even did away with Lex Luthor.

    The show has a stellar cast of actors supplying the major characters' voices with a roster of guest talent (CCH Pounder, Michael Ironside, Robert Picardo, Hector Elizondo, Mark Hamill, Clancy Brown, and others) that is second to none.

    The show, though not a ratings juggernaut (due to frequent changes in airing times), is a treat for the boomer generation and is a welcome addition to the mythos that DC Comics created over six decades ago.