Review

  • First thing first: for those who love watching Brian De Palma films, this is a must-see film for you. Femme Fatale is one of Brian De Palma's greatest thrillers, along with Dressed to Kill, Carrie, Obsession etc. If you are not familiar with Brian De Palma films, it might be best if you watch some of his more conventional thrillers before watching Femme Fatale.

    This is definitely one of De Palma's more personal films to date, and as he both directed and wrote the screenplay for Femme Fatale, he has virtually complete control over the film. Every single camera shot has a meaning to it, and this film as many of De Palma's classic camera styles, such as split screen slow motion action sequences, long takes before a disaster occurs etc.

    A lot of the talent behind this movie also comes from the cast. Rebecca Romjin-Stamos gives a noteworthy performance as the bisexual seductive Laure Ash, and Anotnio Banderas excels himself as Nicolas Bardo, the retired still-obsessed professional photographer, who gets trapped in Laure-aka-Lily's seductive web. Other noteworthy performances got to Peter Coyote as Bruce Watts, and Eriq Ebouaney as the sinister and ruthless Black Tie.

    Generally, the screenplay for the movie is well-written and flows smoothly throughout the movie (except for the ending, which is a little bit strange. Those who have seen the movie would know what I'm talking about).Also, one there's one pretty major problem with the heist at the beginning, but you don't really notice it when you're watching(I only picked it up after my fifth viewing of it).

    Also,Femme Fatale wouldn't be the same were it not for the film's sweeping and riveting score, which sets the slightly mystical yet mysterious tone for the film.

    Overall, a top-notch De Palma classic, although no-lovers of Brian De Palma may not appreciate it in it's full brilliance