• Several aspects of the film startle you. Unlike usual Hollywood works on the Bible, this one indicates that population in the Holy Land was a lot less than today--only European director Pasolini's "Gospel According to St Mathew" came close to this fact. While the film is faithful to the text in most places (including art direction of David's first glimpse of Bathsheba), the film's veracity crumbles with the death of Absalom--whose death was linked to his long hair--shown in the film as merely being hit on the forehead by a low branch.

    Continuity is s problem too. Joab's attempt to attack the Jebusite fort (later called Jerusalem) is depicted to gain David's favor. Soon we find he won David's favor, What happened in the interim is not shown.

    Note: Michal and Abigail are played by two different actresses not one. A reader, Clayton Slaughter, of this review pointed out to me that the final film was the amalgamation of two films (one shot in Israel, the other in Spain) by two directors, which explains this oddity.

    I prefer Bruce Beresford's "King David" with Richard Gere that has received more brickbats than bouquets. It had fine performances, good direction, and intelligent camera-work--although it took artistic license with the the story.