• Stephen Boyd leads an impressive cast (Milton Berle, Edie Adams, Ernest Borgnine, Joseph Cotten, Jill St John, Eleanor Parker, Tony Bennet, Peter Lawford, Jack Soo, Elke Sommer) in this flawed Hollywood expose for the masses. The biggest flaw being that he's supposed to be an unscrupulous guy (which he is) who steps over everyone (which he does) in order to get to the top echelon of Hollywood actors. Once he gets a taste of life at the top, problems arise, because of all the people he's used and disposed of to get there. It sounds bad, however, the way his part is written doesn't do justice to how bad he's supposed to be. He's just another aggressive lout, with at least episodes of decency, who's self-blinded by the unreasonable purpose to reach the top. Anyone who's watched a few movies has seen characters who are much worse. Nonetheless, he gets a great comeuppance towards the end of the film that is worth waiting for, not that you have to suffer through a terrible film in the meanwhile. There's more than enough to string the viewer along, with pretty good performances by Milton Berle as Boyd's agent, and Joseph Cotten as the head of the studio. Granted, Tony Bennet is no actor, but there are nifty parts for Jill St John, Edie Adams, and Ernest Borgnine, as well as Peter Lawford.