• So this is what Jennifer Lopez can do when she tries! She is well cast as a tough Chicago female cop. I once had a friend who was a female cop in Washington, DC, I hung out with her cop pals sometimes, took part in their banter about their latest arrests, was even taken to see them in the cells, and all of that sort of thing is completely accurately portrayed in this film. This is obviously very much Lopez's own natural element: street life and all that goes with it. I can actually believe that she could have become just such a policewoman. She should play more such roles with true grit, as they suit her better than normal romances. She actually looks completely natural when she is punching people in the face and laying them out cold. (I hope she doesn't do that at home.) Apparently she insisted that the mysterious man in the film must be played by Jim Caviezel, which was the perfect choice, and her instinct was spot on. Caviezel does a wonderful job, and his mysterious eyes are just right for someone who does not actually know whether he is dead or alive, and could be either. The deeper purpose of this film is to show the dark, swirling psychological whirlpools of Lopez's family story on the one hand and Caviezel's tale on the other hand. Lopez is superb at conveying her searing emotional turmoil, which is constantly erupting above the surface as rage. Both her father and her brother are uncontrollably violent wife-bashers. She did the right thing as a girl by calling the police when he was beating up her mother, and had him arrested. Not only did the father never really speak to her again, but the mother could not forgive her either, which is of course typical of many battered wives, who suffer from the psychological sickness of not wanting to put a stop to it, and who have married these men on purpose (subconsciously, of course); the sister-in-law is another one who is just the same. Really, there is nothing more annoying than a battered woman who secretly wants it. The irony is that Lopez herself, in going 'to the side of the law' and becoming a policewoman, ends up using her fists a lot herself, but this time to stop crime, not to beat up a spouse. This shows how violent impulses can be turned away from the bad and be used for the good sometimes. (However, special forces soldiers, who are an extreme version of this, generally end up as psychological wrecks, and I know some.) Caviezel's dilemma and the coincidence of their double meetings border on the supernatural, and talented director Luis Mandoki and equally talented writer Gerald di Pego (they earlier collaborated on the excellent 1999 film 'Message in a Bottle') stress all the most mysterious angles in this tale, which makes the whole film more profound than it might otherwise have been, without ever descending into affectation. Shirley Knight gives excellent acting support, and the whole cast are good. This is a highly worthwhile film, which takes a star who often does superficial films and puts her into something real, with excellent results.