• Insane Hong Kong presentation! Maybe even more so than its previous outings. Coming out a year after the very average 1986 "Mr Vampire II", which kept the same idea but set the madness within modern times in a more family friendly tone. However director Ricky Leu's conviction would see the third entry of this atypical cult series goes back to its roots, presenting a period fantasy horror comedy that never lets up on its arrant lunacy... fear or the humour.

    A priest who rock ups in a town has two ghosts (his nephews) that he uses to scam people, by using them to do a haunting while then being hired to get rid of them. But that gets put on the back-burner when he bumps into the master and his loyal men. Putting things aside they join together to vanquish a witch and her army, but it ends up being no easy task..

    An abundance of endearing slapstick humour, vividly staged costume and set-designs, flamboyantly up-tempo martial arts / choreographed stunts, wacky performances and gimmicky, but cleverly used special effects. Everything is piled on, while not always coming off (namely the humour -- as it's really in-your-face); it just remains too much fun and the rapid pacing means it never gets bog down for long. The story is busy, busy, busy and Leu's direction is expansively flashy. The atmospheric horror actually installs some intriguingly artistic visuals with the imaginatively violent thrills being evenly served alongside the comedy of errors the characters were finding themselves stuck in. Vampires might no feature, but you get some spooky, menacing demons / spirits for the motley, but dedicated crew to take on. Lam Ching-Ying returns again as the straight-face master, in quite a rock-solid and assured performance. Around him everyone is chipping in with playfully palatable turns; Richard Ng, Billy Lau and Ho Kin Wai.

    Part 3 is a worthy, entertaining sequel.