• Warning: Spoilers
    The performances in this movie were great for the most part, and it was definitely a decent caper film. However, the movie was sold on the premise we were going to get the real scoop on the hitherto unreported story of how in 1972 mobsters scored $30 million in dirty slush fund money stashed by Nixon CREEPS in safety deposit boxes in California National Bank. This turned out to be as disappointing as watching Geraldo open Al Capone's vault.

    The performances by the two Aussies, Travis Fimmel (Harry Barber) and Tasmanian angel Rachael Tayler (Molly Murphy) were great. They were sincere, likeable, and they had good romantic chemistry. This movie had kind of a "my escape from the mob" theme, and you couldn't help but to root for Harry and Molly to get away and live happily ever after.

    The mobster performances were also very good. William Fichtner (crew leader Enzo) gave a good performance, as usual, and watching the gang members interact was enjoyable, although some of the gang members sounded a little more Brooklyn than Youngstown, Ohio.

    Forest Whitaker is always enjoyable to watch, but it seemed like his character was there primarily to insert a couple of "facts" into the film. Such as (1) that there seemed to be an awful lot of high-level federal interest in this robbery, and (2) that CREEP member Chuck Coulson had a baseball card collection in one of the safety deposit boxes. Now, I have no idea if these are true, but these are interesting facts. Even taken as true, however, they show little more evidence of a secret $30 million Nixon stash than an average CNN broadcast provides actual evidence of Trump-Russia collusion. No $30 million stash was ever found, and no amount vulgar anti-Nixon rants expressed by several of the characters in this movie changes this fact.

    Tell Geraldo to go back home. This one's empty too.