Review

  • This, probable the best known of all Mafia movies, opens on post war New York and is centred on the Corleone crime family. In particular it tells of Don Vito Corleone, its aging patriarch, and his son Michael, who he hope will succeed outside the business. It is a time of change for organised crime; there are those who believe the future lies in the supply of illegal narcotics something Don Vito believes will lead to their destruction as the authorities won't turn a blind eye like they do to illicit gambling. It isn't long before an attempt is made on his life. After that Michael is pulled into the business as he seeks revenge. Soon a mob war is triggered and nobody is truly safe.

    To call a film 'sprawling' might not be considered a compliment but here it is meant as one; for almost three hours we are shown ten years in the lives of one family. Highs and lows. It is a story that will see Michael transform from the man he wants to be to the man circumstances force him to be. It isn't a story that glorifies the mafia; it shows that these 'men of honour' have little... the day you are told your safety is assured is the day you are killed. The cast is great with Marlon Brando impressing in his oft imitated performance as Don Vito and Al Pacino doing a really fine job as Michael, a character who changes believably as events affect him. The rest of the cast, which includes James Caan, Robert Duvall. Sterling Hayden and Diane Keaton are also great. Director Francis Ford Coppola does a great job bringing the story to the screen, helped by a fine soundtrack from Nino Rota. Overall I'd say this is a must see for all fill fans.