Furcht (1917)

  |  Horror


Furcht (1917) Poster

After years travelling the world, Count Greven returns home with the art treasures he has collected. But his disposition has altered dramatically and he is a troubled man. Will he suffer ... See full summary »


6.2/10
126

Get More From IMDb

For an enhanced browsing experience, get the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


16 November 2007 | F Gwynplaine MacIntyre
9
| Wiene is good, but Veidt is brilliant.
I saw 'Furcht' in July 1996 at the Cinema Ritrovato festival in Bologna. They screened a print with the original German intertitles, loaned by the Deutsches Institut für Filmkunde.

One of my all-time favourite films is 'The Cabinet of Dr Caligari', which is by far the most famous movie directed by Robert Wiene. However, that film was in pre-production with Fritz Lang intended as the director; Wiene stepped in only at the last moment, and much of the movie's appeal is due to the remarkable production design (by Hermann Warm) or other factors for which Wiene cannot take credit. 'Furcht' is a more accurate representation of Wiene's directorial talents: it's not nearly so good as 'Caligari' (few films are!), but Wiene proves himself able to create an eerie dream-like mood which suits this story admirably. Whereas the events in 'Caligari' are clearly a madman's nightmare, the nightmarish story of 'Furcht' seems to be more firmly rooted in reality and sanity, and only gradually do we begin to feel that the events on the screen may be the protagonist's nightmare rather than his reality ... or perhaps they are both, in which case he has no escape.

Bruno Decarli plays a European aristocrat in Java. He takes a fancy to a weird-looking statue of a local pagan god, which is protected by an even weirder-looking priest (played by Conrad Veidt, who is apparently portraying a Hindu). Decarli decides to steal the statue; in order to achieve this, he murders the priest. However, the priest's ghost haunts Decarli, warning him that he will die in seven days' time...

Conrad Veidt was one of the best actors in silent films. He seemed rather less successful in talkies, possibly down to having aged a few years and lost the knife-edge of his virility. In 'Furcht', Veidt is astonishingly thin and absolutely compelling as a wraith. I've seen hundreds of actors portray ghosts, but Veidt's performance here is one of the very few which convinced me that the character was actually speaking from the realm of the dead. Veidt's gaunt appearance and his expressive hands skilfully convey the incessant hunger of the dead and their resentment of the living. I'll rate this movie 9 out of 10, and I wish that Weine's films came up to this standard more often.

More Like This

The Hands of Orlac

The Hands of Orlac

The Haunted Castle

The Haunted Castle

Genuine: The Tragedy of a Vampire

Genuine: The Tragedy of a Vampire

Crime and Punishment

Crime and Punishment

Crown of Thorns

Crown of Thorns

The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari

The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari

L'autre

L'autre

The Knight of the Rose

The Knight of the Rose

Der verführte Heilige

Der verführte Heilige

Ultimatum

Ultimatum

Journey into the Night

Journey into the Night

Die Nacht der Königin Isabeau

Die Nacht der Königin Isabeau

Did You Know?

Storyline

Plot Summary


Genres

Horror

The Best TV and Movies to Watch in May

Check out our editors' picks to get the lowdown on the movies and shows we're looking forward to this month, including Steve Carell in "Space Force."

Browse our picks

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com