Nosferatu (1922)

Not Rated   |    |  Fantasy, Horror


Nosferatu (1922) Poster

Vampire Count Orlok expresses interest in a new residence and real estate agent Hutter's wife.


7.9/10
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  • Max Schreck in Nosferatu (1922)
  • Max Schreck in Nosferatu (1922)
  • Nosferatu (1922)
  • Nosferatu (1922)
  • Greta Schröder in Nosferatu (1922)
  • Max Schreck in Nosferatu (1922)

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Cast & Crew

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Director:

F.W. Murnau

Writers:

Henrik Galeen (screen play), Bram Stoker (based on the novel: "Dracula")

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23 March 2000 | keihan
My conception of the vampire made celluloid...
I despise most vampire stories. Not even Florence Stoker's dear departed husband could keep me occupied after the first act in Transylvania in "Dracula". The vampire has been so romanticized as an archetype (particularly during the '90s) that I can't but feel that most horror fans have forgotten exactly what made us afraid of these guys to begin with. Murnau's "Nosferatu" is just such a reminder and, because of that, is the only screen version of "Dracula" that I have ever loved.

Though Murnau, in the hopes of dodging the copyright bullet, took many liberties with the novel, he actually shot a great part of the film on location (an unusual practice for the time) in the historical Dracula's old stomping grounds: the Carpathian Mountains in Romania. The town, landscapes, and castles were all for real, not just some fancy studio backdrop. To me, it helps convey the tone of authenticity, as you can believe this story being told. As for Max Schreck, no charming, suave seducer is he. With his bald head, bushy eyebrows, rat-like teeth, pointed ears, nails as long as the fingers they are attached to, emaciated build, and stare that seems to come from the bottom of Hell itself, he is the primal, archetypal image of the vampire of legend.

While some could interpret this tale as a subtext to Nazism or anti-Semetism, at it's core, it's simply the tale of a monster, who brings ruin and death in his wake. That such a tale has managed to survive it's era, considering the obstacles that could have totally removed it from view, is the gain of all who have seen. Eat your heart out, Bela Lugosi.

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