My Best Girl (1927)

Unrated   |    |  Comedy, Romance


My Best Girl (1927) Poster

A department store's stock girl falls in love with a co-worker, the son of the store's manager; the feeling is mutual though he is engaged to a debutante and focusing on becoming successful without the influence of his father.


7.4/10
746

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  • Mary Pickford and Charles 'Buddy' Rogers in My Best Girl (1927)
  • Mary Pickford in My Best Girl (1927)
  • Mary Pickford in My Best Girl (1927)
  • Mary Pickford and Charles 'Buddy' Rogers in My Best Girl (1927)
  • Carmelita Geraghty in My Best Girl (1927)
  • My Best Girl (1927)

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18 March 2002 | chewbacuh1
The end of an era
My Best Girl is Mary Pickford's last silent film...the last big go around for America's Sweetheart. In this film, she goes back to her roots...she plays someone her own age. Unlike the gothic Sparrows, or the poor low class lady in Suds, Mary comes off as striking and fills the screen with her beauty and charm. She plays a stock girl in a large department store, who falls in love with the owner's son, which at first she doesn't realize. She has to deal with her strange family, where they all look to her for leadership. The owner's son (Buddy Rogers, whom Mary later really marries) must deal with his parents and other girlfriend when he too returns her love. What's charming about this picture, is when I watched it late at night recently, is to notice how much the world has really changed since 1927. Remember when a family actually owned a department store instead of faceless boards of directors and changing CEOs? And how the cash registers rang up 5 cents for a total purchase? How the department stores has sales people every few feet to help you? How the street was filled with cars that now can only be found in museums? How innocent the dating was reflected in film...kissing was like...going all the way! It is also interesting to notice how the rich were shown on film in the 1920s. I'll bet most people in the audience could only dream of homes like those shown. And that all the actors and actresses you see are now gone, their image lives on in film..which is a moment captured in time forever.

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