The Second 100 Years (1927)

Passed   |    |  Comedy, Short


The Second 100 Years (1927) Poster

Thrown in prison for a hundred years, Little Goofy and Big Goofy finally break free, posing as an anarchic duo of undercover painters. Soon, the boys wind up in a private party as visiting French dignitaries; however, who are they kidding?


6.9/10
596

Photos

  • Stan Laurel and Rosemary Theby in The Second 100 Years (1927)
  • Oliver Hardy and Stan Laurel in The Second 100 Years (1927)
  • The Second 100 Years (1927)
  • Oliver Hardy and Ellinor Vanderveer in The Second 100 Years (1927)
  • Dorothy Coburn and Stan Laurel in The Second 100 Years (1927)
  • Stan Laurel in The Second 100 Years (1927)

See all photos

Get More From IMDb

For an enhanced browsing experience, get the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


25 July 2001 | andy stew
6
| Two hundred years with Stan & Ollie? Bliss
Originally advertised as the first 'official' Laurel & Hardy film (although still part of the Hal Roach 'All-Star' films - designed to feature old stars of the Roach 'stable' on the downgrade, and showcase those whom Roach hoped would be future stars - in which Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy had been appearing since the previous year; the first film in the 'Laurel & Hardy' series would be SHOULD MARRIED MEN GO HOME?, released in 1928), this is a mildly amusing little comedy, with Stan ('Little Goofy') and Oliver teamed as convicts who escape from prison and assume different disguises. Part of the interest surrounding this film stems not only from the fact that it is the first 'official' Laurel & Hardy film, but also from it being the film that led Stan Laurel to acquire his famous spiky hair that became a part of his screen image. Both Stan and Oliver had their heads shaved for this film, and later, as his hair was growing back, Stan noticed that his constant attempts to keep his hair under control were causing the crew and other people on the Hal Roach lot to laugh. So Stan, the greatest gag inventor (and gag executor) that ever lived, decided to keep his hair spiked in his films, due to its usefulness as a laugh-getter. Stan and Oliver's shaved heads can also be seen in the next film they made together, a cameo in the Max Davidson comedy, CALL OF THE CUCKOOS.

This film can be enjoyed to a greater extent (as can all the silent films) with the addition of wonderful recreations of the Shields and Hatley tunes by the Beau Hunks orchestra - those who own a copy of THE SECOND HUNDRED YEARS on VVL as I do are fortunate enough to have these marvellous little melodies playing in the background; if you don't, buy the CDs and play them while you're watching.

Critic Reviews


More Like This

Do Detectives Think?

Do Detectives Think?

With Love and Hisses

With Love and Hisses

Duck Soup

Duck Soup

From Soup to Nuts

From Soup to Nuts

Their Purple Moment

Their Purple Moment

Sailors, Beware!

Sailors, Beware!

The Battle of the Century

The Battle of the Century

Leave 'em Laughing

Leave 'em Laughing

We Faw Down

We Faw Down

Sugar Daddies

Sugar Daddies

Putting Pants on Philip

Putting Pants on Philip

Two Tars

Two Tars

Storyline

Plot Summary


Genres

Comedy | Short

This Week on TV: "The Flash," "Limetown," and More

Plan your week of TV watching with our list of all the new originals, adaptations, and "double" features you can't miss.

Watch our video

Featured on IMDb

Check out the action from New York Comic Con check out what IMDb editors are watching this month, and more.

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com