The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928)

Not Rated   |    |  Biography, Drama, History


The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928) Poster

In 1431, Jeanne d'Arc is placed on trial on charges of heresy. The ecclesiastical jurists attempt to force Jeanne to recant her claims of holy visions.

TIP
Add this title to your Watchlist
Save movies and shows to keep track of what you want to watch.

8.2/10
39,645

Photos

  • Maria Falconetti in The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928)
  • Maurice Schutz in The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928)
  • The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928)
  • Maria Falconetti in The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928)
  • The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928)
  • Michel Simon in The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928)

See all photos

More of What You Love

Find what you're looking for even quicker with the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Cast & Crew

Top Billed Cast



Director:

Carl Theodor Dreyer

Writers:

Joseph Delteil, Carl Theodor Dreyer

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


16 September 2004 | checyn
Sensory Shift
This film almost leads one to believe that sound betrays the emotion the eyes capture. Just as the blind develop hearing far better than the average, the deaf develop a keen sense of sight. I am convinced that a lack of dialogue forces us to read the language of the face and body, a verbage unmatched in beauty and nuance. Though the accompanying musical piece (be careful not to identify it as a score), so deliciously inspired by the film, enhances the visual playground; it is the actors' faces that comprise this tour de force. Ms. Falconetti shifts from worry and doubt to unabashed conviction in a single shot, giving the viewer the luck of seeing one's thoughts in progress. She needs no response to the interrogation, it's all in her face. Renee is not superficially beautiful and the lack of make-up only reinforces how bare Joan is, but it is the uncanny ability of an incomparable stage actor to be a window into the soul that makes her so stunning, for the soul we see is one we only wish to attain for ourselves. The Church sees what we see, and they respond just as clearly to her unspoken protest with vehement pomp. The cinematography is so astounding for its time no comment could ever do it justice. Though many comments can be made, and are, surrounding the inspiration and detail for the set, it is at its core an incredible gift from Dreyer to the actors meant to inspire. It plays little part in the film, but to pull an inconceivable last drop of reality from the actors. A testament I can imagine will never be matched to the incredible power of silence.

Critic Reviews



Featured on IMDb

Check out our guide to the Academy Awards, our coverage of the 2019 awards season, and more.

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com