Lucky Boy (1929)

  |  Comedy, Drama, Musical


Lucky Boy (1929) Poster

A young Jewish man works in his father's jewelry business, but he doesn't like it at all--he wants to be an entertainer, something he knows that his father would never approve of. He comes ... See full summary »


7.5/10
71

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2 October 2017 | salvidienusorfitus
5
| Unintentionally funny talking sequences. Songs OK.
The talking sequences in this Part-Talking film are unintentionally funny. I assume this was Tiffany's first attempt at making a film with talking sequences as I have never seen an early talkie with such slow speech, as if it was necessary for the actors to speak slowly in order for the audience to understand. The film would have been improved if the talking sequences were replaced with the Synchronized Score. The singing sequences are OK. The best songs are "My Mother's Eyes" and "Among My Souvenirs".... but based on his performance in this film, George Jessel was no actor. His singing is pleasing however, if a bit overly sentimental.

A very young Glenda Farrell appears in a bit role as a secretary and she is the best actor who has a speaking part. Her voice is natural and not slow and ridiculous like most of the rest of the actors. Margaret Quimby, for example, who plays George Jessel's love interest is terrible and her slow speech and overacting is laughable. Gwen Lee, Richard Tucker and Mary Doran (all of whom were superb actors in early talkies) are completely wasted in non-talking parts and not given a chance to speak. We hear Richard Tucker say exactly two words while he is off screen. Clearly Tiffany-Stahl was clueless about what actors had voices suitable for talking pictures.

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Details

Release Date:

2 February 1929

Language

English


Country of Origin

USA

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