The Dark Horse (1932)

Passed   |    |  Comedy


The Dark Horse (1932) Poster

Jailbird is hired to lead a dimwitted candidate's campaign for governor.


7.3/10
887

Photos

  • Bette Davis and Warren William in The Dark Horse (1932)
  • Warren William in The Dark Horse (1932)
  • Warren William in The Dark Horse (1932)
  • Bette Davis and Warren William in The Dark Horse (1932)
  • Bette Davis and Warren William in The Dark Horse (1932)
  • Bette Davis, Guy Kibbee, and Warren William in The Dark Horse (1932)

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Reviews & Commentary

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User Reviews


4 September 2004 | dcole-2
7
| A tribute to Warren William
The main reason to see this film is Warren William, who is in top form as the shyster campaign manager. He is electric, constantly finding ways to fool the public and defeat the opposing party in the midst of the biggest disasters. William is a great actor -- I feel he never got his due. Bette Davis as his girlfriend also shines in an under-written role. Personally, I found Guy Kibbee not quite right as the lame-brained candidate that William and the others are trying to foist on the public. He seemed more like an empty canvas than a person. I would have preferred to see a real character emerge rather than a non-character. The story itself is implausible, silly and clichéd. But Warren William and Bette Davis are well worth watching.

Critic Reviews


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Did You Know?

Trivia

The Abraham Lincoln speech referred to in this movie wasn't a speech at all, but a published letter from Lincoln. It was his first announcement of running for political office. He was just 23 years old at the time and was a newcomer to Illinois - having moved there in 1830. He was running for a seat in the Illinois General Assembly. The letter was printed March 9, 1832, in the Sangamo Journal of Springfield, IL. The letter is lengthy and describes Lincoln's views on public improvements, navigation of the Sangamon River, and education.

The words, supposedly plagiarized in this movie from a Lincoln speech, were at the end of the last paragraph in his long letter. They read, "I am young and unknown to many of you. I was born and have ever remained in the most humble walks of life. I have no wealthy or popular relations to recommend me. My case is thrown exclusively upon the independent voters of this county, and if elected they will have conferred a favor upon me, for which I shall be unremitting in my labors to compensate. But if the good people in their wisdom shall see fit to keep me in the back ground, I have been too familiar with disappointments to be very much chagrined." The letter was signed, "Your friend and fellow-citizen, A. Lincoln, New Salem, March 9, 1832.


Quotes

Zachary Hicks: Ow ow ow ow! I've got this thing caught on one of my...
Zachary Hicks: ... legs.


Soundtracks

Hail! Hail! The Gang's All Here
(1904) (uncredited)
Music by
Theodore Morse and Arthur Sullivan
Played at the convention

Storyline

Plot Summary


Genres

Comedy

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