The Invisible Man (1933)

TV-PG   |    |  Horror, Sci-Fi


The Invisible Man (1933) Poster

A scientist finds a way of becoming invisible, but in doing so, he becomes murderously insane.


7.7/10
29,426


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  • Gloria Stuart and Henry Travers in The Invisible Man (1933)
  • Claude Rains and Gloria Stuart in The Invisible Man (1933)
  • Claude Rains and Gloria Stuart in The Invisible Man (1933)
  • Forrester Harvey and Una O'Connor in The Invisible Man (1933)
  • Claude Rains in The Invisible Man (1933)
  • Claude Rains in The Invisible Man (1933)

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Reviews & Commentary

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User Reviews


1 December 2004 | Snow Leopard
Works Very Well
This film version of the H.G. Wells science fiction classic works very well. It has a number of strengths, but it benefits most of all from James Whale's direction, creativity, and technical excellence. Both the flashier aspects of the movie (such as the "invisibility" effects) and also most of the basic elements are done with skill.

The story is for the most part based on the one main idea of "The Invisible Man" who combines his scientific genius with a generous supply of madness. The story is interesting enough in itself, and of course it provides all kinds of opportunities for visual tricks. Whale hits just the right balance in making good use of these opportunities without over-indulging himself.

The visual effects themselves are of excellent quality, and they are far better than all but the very best of the present-day computer imagery. While it is usually rather easy to spot which parts of a movie are computer-generated, Whale's effects are all but seamless, with the exception of a handful of brief moments. They are often quite impressive, without resorting to tired devices, such as explosions and the like, in order to impress those with shorter attention spans.

Claude Rains does quite well for having such limitations on what he could do. The rest of the cast is solid, if mostly unspectacular, letting the story do the work. Una O'Connor somewhat overdoes it with the screaming this time, but otherwise the characters are believable. The acting may seem slightly quaint to those who are accustomed to the pretentious styles of the present generation of performers, but it's certainly better than the grating, self-important performances in some of the recent movies of the same genre.

While the story does not have the thematic depth or the suggestive imagery of horror classics like "Frankenstein" or "Dracula", this adaptation gets everything it can out of the material, telling the story in an entertaining fashion and with technical skill.

Metacritic Reviews


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Did You Know?

Trivia

The Invisible Man and the Creature from the Black Lagoon are the only Universal monsters that were never used later by Hammer, unlike Dracula, Frankenstein's character and creature, the Wolf Man and the Mummy.


Quotes

Man in Pub: Did you hear about Mrs. Mason's little Willy? Sent him to school and found him buried ten-foot deep in a snow drift.
Man in Pub # 2: How did they get him out?
Man in Pub: Brought the fire engine 'round, put the hose pipe in, pumped it backwards and sucked him out.


Goofs

When Griffin threatens Kemp by the open window in the sitting room, Kemp's left hand jumps on and off the desk between shots.


Crazy Credits

Claude Rains is the only actor in the film whose character is identified in the credits. We are not told which roles the other actors play, even though the cast is listed twice: at the beginning and at the end. Rains is billed as "The Invisible One" in the opening credits and as "The Invisible Man" in the closing credits.


Alternate Versions

When the film was released to home video, Universal Studios replaced a snippet of music heard on the radio when Dr. Kemp is reading a newspaper in his house, and the Invisible Man enters through a set of French doors. Universal was unable to secure the rights for the original music and replaced it, covering the original sound effects (the sound of the newspaper and the door latch) in the process.


Soundtracks

Here We Go Gathering Nuts in May
(uncredited)
Traditional children's song
Sung a cappella by
Claude Rains

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Horror | Sci-Fi

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