Forsaking All Others (1934)

Passed   |    |  Comedy, Drama, Romance


Forsaking All Others (1934) Poster

Dill leaves Mary standing at the altar in order to marry his old flame, Connie, instead. Knowing that Mary still has feelings for Dill, Jeff keeps quiet about his own love for her.

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6.2/10
969

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  • Joan Crawford and Robert Montgomery in Forsaking All Others (1934)
  • Clark Gable and Joan Crawford in Forsaking All Others (1934)
  • Joan Crawford and Robert Montgomery in Forsaking All Others (1934)
  • Clark Gable and Joan Crawford in Forsaking All Others (1934)
  • Joan Crawford in Forsaking All Others (1934)
  • "Forsaking All Others," Clark Gable and Joan Crawford. 1933 MGM

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14 November 2009 | AlsExGal
8
| A very good 1930's romantic comedy
This is one of the several movies that Joan Crawford made with Clark Gable, and fortunately quite a few of them (maybe all) have made it to at least DVD-R via the Warner Archive. This is one of the best the two did together. It's a romantic comedy in which Joan plays socialite Mary Clay, who is about to marry lifelong acquaintance Dillon Todd (Robert Montgomery). Clark Gable plays another of Mary's lifelong friends, Jeff Williams. Jeff has been long away from home and decides to come back just to ask Mary to marry him, unaware that Mary is about to marry Dillon. When he learns about their upcoming marriage he decides to keep his feelings to himself, although the look he has as if having been punched in the stomach when he hears the news says it all. Robert Montgomery is playing the usual harmless playboy character here that he did so much of in the early 1930's. It looks like Mary and Dillon's marriage is about to go off without a hitch until one of Dillon's old girlfriends appears on the scene.

This film was released about six months after the precode era ended, so there is nothing really racey going on here. About the most extreme thing you will see is Robert Montgomery in a dress. However, W.S. Van Dyke is the director of this film, and he knew how to combine sexual tension and comedy in an age of aggressive censorship, and this is a fine example of his work. I highly recommend it to fans of films of the 1930's.

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