Of Human Bondage (1934)

Not Rated   |    |  Drama, Romance


Of Human Bondage (1934) Poster

A young man finds himself attracted to a cold and unfeeling waitress who may ultimately destroy them both.

TIP
Add this title to your Watchlist
Save movies and shows to keep track of what you want to watch.

7.3/10
5,419

Photos

  • Bette Davis and Leslie Howard in Of Human Bondage (1934)
  • Leslie Howard and Frances Dee in Of Human Bondage (1934)
  • Bette Davis and Leslie Howard in Of Human Bondage (1934)
  • Leslie Howard and Frances Dee in Of Human Bondage (1934)
  • Bette Davis in Of Human Bondage (1934)
  • Bette Davis in Of Human Bondage (1934)

See all photos

More of What You Love

Find what you're looking for even quicker with the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


26 November 2004 | ClassicAndCampFilmReviews
Still gives me goosebumps!
Bette Davis became a star with her role in this first and best film adaptation of the Somerset Maugham novel of the same name (well worth a read). This was her first nomination for an Academy Award, for her portrayal of Mildred Rogers; a tawdry, sluttish, cockney waitress who bewitches hapless Philip Carey (Leslie Howard, best known for his role as Ashley Wilkes in "Gone With the Wind"). She lost the award, receiving it for her role the following year for "Dangerous", which is generally viewed as a consolation prize.

The supporting cast includes Reginald Denny, Alan Hale Sr. (father of Alan Hale Jr., who was the skipper on the TV series "Gilligan's Isle"), and a breathtakingly beautiful Frances Dee.

The film starts out with Philip, a failed art student with a clubfoot of which he is highly sensitive, turning to the study of medicine after facing the fact that he has no artistic talent. Shortly thereafter he meets and quickly becomes obsessed with Mildred, despite her sneering and obvious disdain for him because of his deformity. Her standard response to his affectionate overtures is a chilly "I don't mind." In his dreams Mildred is sweet and kind to him; during real time she uses him, well aware of his affection for her, leaving him for other men and returning when she is down on her luck, ruining his chance for having a career or a normal life with another woman; he seems to continually finds himself inexorably drawn to her, even after his love for her has waned, until the day she finally pushes him too far.

At that point, the camera fully turns to Mildred as her facial expression shifts from supplication to shock to full-on bitch in a matter of seconds, and she reacts to Philip's statement with a barrage of blood-curdling insults. Bette Davis as Mildred never fails to raise the hair on the back of my neck and arms with her performance in this particular scene.

This is the role that made Davis a star. It's also one of my all-time favorite Davis films, along with such others as "The Little Foxes", "The Letter", and "All About Eve".

Critic Reviews


Are You a Sansa or a Cersei?

"Game of Thrones" Season 8 has finally premiered, so in celebration we take to the streets to see which characters fans relate to the most.

Watch now

Featured on IMDb

Check out our guide to superheroes, horror movies, and more.

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com