A Night at the Opera (1935)

Passed   |    |  Comedy, Music, Musical


A Night at the Opera (1935) Poster

A sly business manager and two wacky friends of two opera singers help them achieve success while humiliating their stuffy and snobbish enemies.


7.9/10
29,464

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  • A Night at the Opera (1935)
  • A Night at the Opera (1935)
  • Groucho Marx in A Night at the Opera (1935)
  • A Night at the Opera (1935)
  • A Night at the Opera (1935)
  • A Night at the Opera (1935)

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Awards

1 win.

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User Reviews


1 August 1998 | mermatt
The Marx Brothers against the world
This is probably the best Marx Brothers film. It is certainly my favorite. The brothers destroy pomposity and pretension by the ton. The pieces of comic business were worked out through many live theater performances before the scenes were finally filmed. This craftsmanship never shows, but it pays off completely. The stateroom scene is a classic, and the total devastation of the opera is a delicious piece of craziness.

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Did You Know?

Trivia

As Otis and Mrs. Claypool are boarding the ocean liner, she asks him, "Do you have everything, Otis?"; he replies, "Well, I haven't had any complaints yet." In two different interviews with Dick Cavett, Groucho Marx claimed that that exchange of dialogue was banned in a majority of states when the film was released because it was too suggestive, although the number of states varied with different tellings of the story.


Quotes

Waiter: The gentleman has not arrived yet?
Mrs. Claypool: No, he has not.
Waiter: I'm afraid the dinner will be spoiled.
Otis B. Driftwood: What difference does it make? It's too late to dine now.
Otis B. Driftwood: Oh, boy?
Bellboy: Yes, ma'am?
Otis B. Driftwood: Will you page Mr. Otis B. Driftwood, please? Mister Otis B. Driftwood.
Bellboy: Paging Mr....


Goofs

When Otis Driftwood is sitting on top of the steamer trunk being pushed by the porter and has the porter stop in front of Rosa's cabin so he can go inside, he's wearing a hat. In the next shot, from inside Rosa's room as he enters it, he's not wearing a hat. When he leaves Rosa's room and goes to Mrs. Claypool's room he's still not wearing a hat, but after he leaves Mrs. Claypool's room and we cut to the next scene which is Driftwood entering his stateroom, he's wearing a hat again.


Alternate Versions

A colorized version exists


Soundtracks

I Pagliacci: Strido lassu
(1892) (uncredited)
Music and Libretto by
Ruggero Leoncavallo
Sung by Kitty Carlisle
Accompanied by The MGM Symphony Orchestra

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Comedy | Music | Musical

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