A Night at the Opera (1935)

Passed   |    |  Comedy, Music, Musical


A Night at the Opera (1935) Poster

A sly business manager and two wacky friends of two opera singers help them achieve success while humiliating their stuffy and snobbish enemies.


7.9/10
30,908


Videos


Photos

  • Kitty Carlisle and Allan Jones in A Night at the Opera (1935)
  • Groucho Marx and Kitty Carlisle in A Night at the Opera (1935)
  • Allan Jones in A Night at the Opera (1935)
  • Freddie Mercury at an event for A Night at the Opera (1935)
  • Groucho Marx and Margaret Dumont in A Night at the Opera (1935)
  • A Night at the Opera (1935)

See all photos

Get More From IMDb

For an enhanced browsing experience, get the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Awards

1 win.

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


23 April 2002 | gapeach17
A classic all the way!
No doubt that "A Night at the Opera" is right up there with "Duck Soup" as the best Marx Brothers movie. Some Marx-purists complain "ANatO" is when the brothers started to grow soft and their quality started to decline. For one thing, instead of ridiculing romantic couples (the love story subplot plays a big part), they support them. Also, it's not as surreal or satirical as their past films. To those purists, I say: Lighten up! "ANatO" is just as funny as anything the Marx Bros did in the past (heck, I think it's funnier than "Monkey Business"), and it's withstood the test of time perfectly. In fact, "ANatO" is said to be Groucho's favorite; he even called his previous films "duds"! The film is filled with jabs at the upper class and double entendres courtesy of Groucho. Sample:

Mrs. Claypool: Do you have everything, Otis?

Otis: I haven't had any complaints yet!

The love story subplot isn't as nauseating as 1937's "A Day at the Races". Allan Jones may be a bit too mushy, but Kitty Carlisle, the love interest, is cool and calm enough to help it go down easily (that's really her singing, by the way). Chico and Harpo have some inspired moments, such as their gleeful butchering of "Il Travotore" (sp?). The hapless villains are the funniest Marx foils ever, and the finale is just uproarious. "ANatO" is a wonderfully silly romp, and it's rather harmless, so kids can probably watch and enjoy it. The famous stateroom scene is nothing short of brilliant, and you'll find yourself humming along to "Cosi Cosa" (I just wish the ballad "Alone" had been left, well, alone). Don't miss this hilarious masterpiece. And now, on with the opera!!

Critic Reviews



Did You Know?

Trivia

Originally, before its reissue in the 1940s the movie started with a title card that places the movie in Milan, Italy, there was then a musical number in which people on the street were "passing along" the melody line of a song, as in the Maurice Chevalier vehicle Love Me Tonight (1932). The song was followed into the restaurant where Mrs. Claypool was waiting for Otis B. Driftwood. Maltin says the scene was cut during World War II to remove references to Italy, and unfortunately, the main negative was cut as well, so the scene is now lost. This was why the stated running time of the movie was three minutes longer than it is now.


Quotes

Waiter: The gentleman has not arrived yet?
Mrs. Claypool: No, he has not.
Waiter: I'm afraid the dinner will be spoiled.
Otis B. Driftwood: What difference does it make? It's too late to dine now.
Otis B. Driftwood: Oh, boy?
Bellboy: Yes, ma'am?
Otis B. Driftwood: Will you page Mr. Otis B. Driftwood, please? Mister Otis B. Driftwood.
Bellboy: Paging Mr. ...
Bellboy: Mr....


Goofs

When Otis Driftwood arrives at his "suite" on the boat, the first time he enters, the room is small. And in the next shots of the room, we see that the room is a little bigger. The pipe that's in the room is closer to the back wall in the first version of the room, and more in the middle in the second version. There's also a 2 light wall sconce in the big room that doesn't appear in the small one.


Alternate Versions

All references to the first portion of the film taking place in Italy were edited from the original negative sometime after the original release. There is speculation that this was done during WWII when Italy was as Axis power, but it also may have been done in the late 1930's to appease Mussolini, who didn't like the way Italians were being portrayed. Either way, the film's first scene begins rather abruptly and is missing a musical number and references to Milan, Italy.


Soundtracks

Sing Ho for the Open Highway! Sing Ho for the Open Road!
(uncredited)
Composer unknown
Sung a cappella by
Groucho Marx

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Comedy | Music | Musical

Our Most Anticipated Movies of 2021

Here are the movies we're most excited for in 2021.

See the full list

Upcoming Horror Films We Can't Wait to See

There's a ton of horror releasing this year. But don't let that scare you. Our editors have rounded up their most anticipated movies of the year.

See the list

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by Taboola

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com