Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936)

Not Rated   |    |  Comedy, Drama, Romance


Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936) Poster

A simple, small town man inherits a massive fortune, making him the target for scammers and publicity-seekers. Overwhelmed by the turn his life has taken, and awoken to another use for his new-found fortune, he makes a momentous decision.

TIP
Add this title to your Watchlist
Save movies and shows to keep track of what you want to watch.

8/10
18,183

Photos

  • Gary Cooper and Jean Arthur in Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936)
  • Gary Cooper and Jean Arthur in Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936)
  • Jean Arthur and George Bancroft in Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936)
  • Jean Arthur and George Bancroft in Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936)
  • Gary Cooper and Jean Arthur in Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936)
  • Gary Cooper in Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936)

See all photos

More of What You Love

Find what you're looking for even quicker with the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


3 August 2004 | jotix100
9
| Tuba player inherits fortune and becomes a Cinderella Man and gets pixiliated in Manhattan!
One of Frank Capra's strengths as a film director was the great team he assembled. Not only did he have a great technical group behind him, but his casts combined talent that went from the major stars to the bit players.

In this fable, Mr. Capra gives an answer to those of us that always pondered: what would one do if one inherited a lot of money, or if one won the lottery (fat chance!) It must be terrifying to suddenly have a lot of wealth, in this case 20 million during the worst days of the Great Depression. Sometimes it's better to stay poor rather than have to deal with strangers that have designs on one's newly found wealth!

Gary Cooper has never been as charming as the tuba playing, country bumpkin whose life is changed dramatically when he has to go to Manhattan to claim his inheritance. His Longfellow Deeds gets to see first hand how the high society, his uncle belonged to, deals with this unsophisticated greeting card writing poet.

Jean Arthur was a natural comedienne. She is wonderful in this movie as the reporter who tricks Deeds into speaking with her and in the process falls in love with the man, the object of the ridicule she writes about.

Leonard Standing, one of the best character actors of the era, is equally effective as Cobb, the man who knows a thing or two about those society folks. George Bancroft was also good as MacWade.

The film has a pace that never lets the viewer down. In comparison with what passes today as film comedy, this is a masterpiece. It shows the genius of Frank Capra in charge of this group of people that make us treasure films like this one even if it's pure nonsense, which after all, was what the director was looking for to make us laugh.

Critic Reviews



Our Favorite Trailers of the Week

See the trailers we loved this week, including "Jessica Jones" Season 3, and Brittany Runs a Marathon. Presented by Microsoft Surface.

Watch our trailer of trailers

Featured on IMDb

See what TV shows editors are excited about this month and check out our guide to Star Wars, video games, and more.

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com