Theodora Goes Wild (1936)

Passed   |    |  Comedy, Romance


Theodora Goes Wild (1936) Poster

The author of a controversially racy best-selling book tries to hide her celebrity status from her provincial small-town neighbors, who'd be scandalized if they knew.


7.2/10
2,117

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Reviews & Commentary

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User Reviews


27 March 2004 | theirenedunnefan
Great Movie!
I've seen this movie many times, and it just keeps getting funnier every time I see it. It reminds me a lot of myself, growing up in a small town like "Lynnfield", and being brought up to think and act the way Theodora was. Then when I moved away from home, some people thought I went "wild!" This has all the qualities for people who can relate to small towns, even with the "worst town gossip" to make you wonder what's going to be spread next... For a fact, this movie is a lot like Irene Dunne's life, actually her friends said they liked her best in this movie, because it is most like her in character. If you come from a small town, it's a classic film you can kinda relate to...and just have to see!

Critic Reviews


Did You Know?

Trivia

The dialogue from this film is re-used in the film Bedtime Story (1941), in which Fredric March portrays a playwright and Loretta Young his actress wife. All the dialogue in March's new "play" is actually from the screenplay of this film. It's virtually word for word, with only the heroine's name changed. The "gardener" referred to in the dialogue is of course Melvyn Douglas. Columbia Pictures, the distributor of "Bedtime Story," made this film, too, but none of the writers overlap between the films. Interestingly, in "Bedtime Story," the actors playing the onstage scene are not meant to be in a comedy. What is borrowed is the confrontation over the gardener between Theodora, her aunt, and the local club ladies. Also, in an early scene, March has an inspiration for the last line of his play - something about nobody in the town ever calling the heroine "baby" before - an idea that figures in "Theodora Goes Wild" as well.


Quotes

Michael Grant: I'll be happy when I'm darn good and ready to be happy, and not a minute sooner.


Goofs

When the train is heard at the station, a shot of a train is shown with locomotive #1333 in the lead followed by another locomotive. However, when the train pulls into the station, the number on the locomotive has changed to #1374 and the second one has disappeared.


Soundtracks

Onward Christian Soldiers
(1871) (uncredited)
Music from "St. Gertrude" by
Arthur Sullivan (1871)
Hymn by Sabine Baring-Gould (1865)
Sung by the congregation at church

Storyline

Plot Summary


Genres

Comedy | Romance

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