The Life of Emile Zola (1937)

Not Rated   |    |  Biography, Drama


The Life of Emile Zola (1937) Poster

The biopic of the famous French muckraking writer and his involvement in fighting the injustice of the Dreyfuss Affair.

TIP
Add this title to your Watchlist
Save movies and shows to keep track of what you want to watch.

7.3/10
6,158

Photos

  • "Life of Emile Zola, The" Joseph Schildraut 1937 Warner Bros. **I.V.
  • Paul Muni and Vladimir Sokoloff in The Life of Emile Zola (1937)
  • "Life of Emile Zola, The" Joseph Schildkraut 1937 Warner Bros. **I.V.
  • Gloria Holden and Paul Muni in The Life of Emile Zola (1937)
  • "Life of Emile Zola, The" Joseph Schildkraut 1937 Warner Bros. **I.V.
  • Paul Muni in The Life of Emile Zola (1937)

See all photos

More of What You Love

Find what you're looking for even quicker with the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


22 September 2003 | harry-76
Memorable Courtroom Speeches
Such occasions are not unlike great arias in operas: the stage lights softly dim and follow spot brightens as all cast characters (and audience) lean forward to focus on the delivery.

Such a moment occurs in "The Life of Emile Zola" as Paul Muni as Zola steps to the platform to deliver his courtroom defense speech. Against all the odds of a jeering mob and negative press, he proceeds to offer a seven minute oration.

The scene is a set-up for Muni, and the camera, editing, and staging are all designed for the actor to deliver his thespian goods. He doesn't disappoint.

Two other cinematic courtroom speeches are comparable: Alec Guiness as Benjamin Disraeli in "The Mudlark" (1950) enjoyed the rare opportunity of having his six minute, uninterrupted speech done in a single, slow tracking shot; and Gary Cooper as Howard Roark in "The Fountainhead" (1949) held a courtroom breathless for over five minutes, defending his act of poetic, if not Randian-judicial, justice.

In Muni's case, his defense scene turned out to be a highpoint of an intriguing acting career. From Yiddish theater to worldwide stardom--with fewer that two dozen films to his credit--Muni constantly enthralled some while leaving others doubtful.

What's undeniable about Muni is that he achieved stardom on his own power. He was able to convince a goodly number of people, both peers and public alike, that he was indeed not just a good but great actor.

While some held a sneaking suspicion that he was a wee bit of a poseur, having never formally studied his craft, it really doesn't matter. Muni didn't win his lucrative acting contracts--or his Academy Award honors--for nothing.

Personally, I enjoy his general work, being more partial to roles more close to his own than those of his elders. In latter cases I felt he often tended to go a bit over-the-top with "stereotypical mannerisms."

As Zola, though, his earnestness and determination proves convincing, and the film itself is peopled with a powerhouse cadre of Warner Bros. character players.

To the film's credit, a pre-enactment inscription admits to the intermingling of fiction with fact for dramatic purposes. This also relieves the production of accusations of historical inaccuracy.

All in all, "The Life of Emile Zola" is a most engrossing biopic of a courageous literary giant who placed the pursuit of justice above the receiving of worldly accolades.

Critic Reviews



Which Roles Did Christian Bale Turn Down?

From American Psycho to Batman Begins to Vice, Christian Bale is a bonafide A-list star. But he missed out on plenty of huge roles along the way. So what were they?

Who else nearly landed Christian?

Featured on IMDb

Check out our guide to the Academy Awards, our coverage of the 2019 awards season, and more.

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com