Gone with the Wind (1939)

Passed   |    |  Drama, History, Romance


Gone with the Wind (1939) Poster

A manipulative woman and a roguish man conduct a turbulent romance during the American Civil War and Reconstruction periods.

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8.2/10
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  • Clark Gable in Gone with the Wind (1939)
  • Eric Linden in Gone with the Wind (1939)
  • Clark Gable and Vivien Leigh in Gone with the Wind (1939)
  • Clark Gable and Vivien Leigh in Gone with the Wind (1939)
  • "Gone with the Wind" Clark Gable, Vivien Leigh 1939 MGM
  • "Gone with the Wind" Charles Hamilton, Vivien Leigh 1939 MGM

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Cast & Crew

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Directors:

Victor Fleming , George Cukor , Sam Wood

Writers:

Margaret Mitchell (story of the old south "Gone with the Wind"), Sidney Howard (screenplay)

Reviews & Commentary

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User Reviews


22 February 2005 | jotix100
10
| Georgia on my mind
This film shows the best of the American cinema. Whether we like the film, or not, one has to recognize the greatest achievement, perhaps, of the creative talent of the people working in the movie industry. "Gone with the Wind" represents a monumental leap, as well as a departure, for the movies, as they were done prior to this film.

The vision of David O. Selznick, the power behind bringing Margaret Mitchell's massive account about the South, before and after the Civil War, pays handsomely with the film that Victor Fleming directed. This movie will live forever because it reminds us of how this great nation came into being, despite the different opinions from the two stubborn factions in the war.

"Gone with the Wind" brought together the best people in Hollywood. The end result is the stunning film that for about four hours keep us interested in the story unfolding in the screen. Of course, credit must be due to the director, Victor Fleming, and his vision, as well as the adaptation by Sydney Howard, who gave the right tone to the film. The gorgeous cinematography created by Ernest Haller gives us a vision of the gentle South before the war, and the Phoenix raising from the ashes of a burned Atlanta. The music of Max Steiner puts the right touch behind all that is seen in the movie.

One can't conceive another Scarlett O'Hara played by no one, but Vivien Leigh. Her beauty, her sense of timing, her intelligent approach to this role, makes this a hallmark performance. Ms. Leigh was at the best moment of her distinguished career and it shows. Scarlett goes from riches to rags, back to riches again and in the process finds an inner strength she didn't know she possessed. Her impossible love for Ashley will consume her and will keep her away from returning the love to the man that really loves her, Rhett.

The same thing applies to the Rhett Butler of Clark Gable. No one else comes to mind for playing him with the passion he projects throughout the movie. This is a man's man. Captain Butler was torn between his loyalty to the cause of the South and his sense of decency. His love for Scarlett, the woman he knows is in love with a dream, speaks eloquently for itself.

The other two principals, Olivia de Havilland and Leslie Howard, give performances that are amazing to watch. Ms. de Havilland's Melanie Hamilton is perfect. Melanie is loyal to the woman that does everything to undermine her marriage to Ashley. Mr. Howard's Ashley gives a perfect balance to the man in love with his wife, while Scarlett keeps tempting him.

The rest of the cast is too numerous to make justice to all the actors one sees on the screen, but omitting the contribution of Hattie McDaniel to the film would be sinful. Ms. McDaniel was such a natural actress that she is excellent no matter in what movie she is playing. This huge talent is a joy to watch.

Comments to this forum express their objections to the way the race relations play in the movie, but being realistic, this movie speaks about the not too distant past where all kinds of atrocities, such as the slavery, were the norm of the land. While those things are repugnant to acknowledge, in the film, they are kept at a minimum. After all, this film is based on a book by one of the daughters of that South, Margaret Mitchell, who is presenting the story as she saw it in her mind, no doubt told to her from relatives that lived in that period of a horrible page in the American history.

Enjoy this monumental classic in all its splendor.

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Did You Know?

Trivia

The 222-minute running time excludes the Overture Music (played before the credits), the Entr'acte Music (played during the intermission) and the Exit Music (played after the film ends). All three were especially recorded for the soundtrack and were heard at the film's original 1939 world premiere. They were seldom played by exhibitors until the 1997 New Line Cinema edition of the film restored them. They are also included on the DVD.


Quotes

Brent Tarleton: What do we care if we *were* expelled from college, Scarlett? The war is gonna start any day now, so we'd have left college anyhow.
Stuart Tarleton: War! Isn't it exciting, Scarlett? You know those fool Yankees actually *want* a war?
Brent Tarleton: We'll show 'em!
Scarlett: Fiddle-dee-dee! ...


Goofs

After Ashley refuses to run away with Scarlett, she turns away, starting to cry, her shawl is halfway off her shoulders, and crooked. Seconds later, it's up to her neck and straight.


Crazy Credits

Rather than simply saying "Selznick International in association with Metro-Goldwyn Mayer presents Margaret Mitchell's 'Gone With the Wind'", the opening credits say "Selznick International in association with Metro-Goldwyn Mayer has the honor to present its Technicolor production of Margaret Mitchell's story of the Old South 'Gone With the Wind'".


Alternate Versions

Issued in Argentina by MGM in 1984 on VHS (in two cassettes) with the opening original prologue with a special one for Foreign versions explaining the circumstances leading to the American civil war. This film went into the public domain in Argentina between 1989 and 1995, and during those years several minor video editors published their own versions (usually lifting them from American editions) and with much more quality than what MGM did in 1984. Several of this companies issued the VHS on a single cassette (the N-PAL color system allowed this), although removing the intermission and the exit music. In 1986, for its second Argentinean TV exhibition two different versions were simultaneously televised. LS85 TV Canal 13 of Buenos Aires used standard dubbed in Spanish print that has also been used by Turner Entertainment and, now, Warner Bros. At the same, on another channel, LS86 TV Canal 2 used a different print, without permission from the copyright owners: the print used was an older dubbed version from Spain, probably lifted from an MGM video edition, featuring all of the titles and signs in the entire film in Spanish. The source from that print was a company called VEA (Video Editora Argentina) that had a partnership with the television station at the time.


Soundtracks

(I Wish I Was in) Dixie's Land
(1860) (uncredited)
Written by
Daniel Decatur Emmett
Played often in the score

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Drama | History | Romance | War

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