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  • A dreadfully boring, dull and lifeless "crime" film that was originally released in the UK as MURDER IN SOHO in 1939 and then released in the States as MURDER IN THE NIGHT in 1940. I watched this last night and even at about only 70 minutes, the film dragged and nearly had me nodding off a couple of times. The film stars Jack La Rue as this big time night club owner and "criminal" who wants only things that the finer parts of life can offer. La Rue actually comes off as likable and is hard to take seriously as a gangster. As a matter of fact, if you look quickly at him from time to time, he resembles Ricky Ricardo! Sandra Storme gives a horrid performance as the new night club act who's help is requested by Scotland Yard to help put an end to La Rue's "criminal reign". A total of four gunshots are fired in the film and there is absolutely no action. Instead you get nearly 70 minutes of hokey dialogue, song and dance and terrible stabs at comedic relief. All in all, a pretty awful movie.
  • dbborroughs19 April 2004
    This is an odd mix of British crime drama and American gangster film that is a bit too slow, even at 70 minutes.

    The plot has to do with a nightclub in London that's run by an American gangster. Through the doors come an assortment of quirky characters. Marco, the gangster, is running a variety of rackets on the side which the police suspect but can't prove. While people party out side Marco kills someone in his office, just as an inspector, arrives to nose around.

    If that sounds exciting, it really isn't. This is a good idea, not very well handled since much of the film is taken up by scenes in the club with the various people coming having a good time. There's romance, lots of humor and some nice acting but the film has the feel of one of the quota films that were produced in England in the 1930's and 40's as a way of keeping the British film industry alive. While this produced many classics, it also produced many duds and near misses. This is a near miss.

    If you see it and you don't mind a too slowly paced film, then by all means, but anyone looking for a movie that moves best look elsewhere.
  • A dreadfully boring, dull and lifeless "crime" film that was originally released in the UK as MURDER IN SOHO in 1939 and then released in the States as MURDER IN THE NIGHT in 1940. I watched this last night and even at about only 70 minutes, the film dragged and nearly had me nodding off a couple of times. The film stars Jack La Rue as this big time night club owner and "criminal" who wants only things that the finer parts of life can offer. La Rue actually comes off as likable and is hard to take seriously as a gangster. As a matter of fact, if you look quickly at him from time to time, he resembles Ricky Ricardo! Sandra Storme gives a horrid performance as the new night club act who's help is requested by Scotland Yard to help put an end to La Rue's "criminal reign". A total of four gunshots are fired in the film and there is absolutely no action. Instead you get nearly 70 minutes of hokey dialogue, song and dance and terrible stabs at comedic relief. All in all, a pretty awful movie.
  • Given that the other reviews on this film come from the US i thought that i would give a British viewpoint.There are 3 actors in this film at the beginnings of their respective careers.Firstly there is Bernard Lee in his 7th film playing a journalist investigating a nightclub shooting.This being a quota quickie we do not get to see his newspaper office for reasons of economy.Googie Withers is here playing in her 16th film since her film career started in 1935.Finally James Hayter long before he became associated with Mr Kiplings Cakes or ended up behind the counter in Grace Brothers. As the producers obviously wanted to sell the film to the States they have cast Jack La Rue as the night club owner and his 2 henchman have dreadful American accents.La Rue rather resembles Eduardo Cianelli but with half the menace. Unfortunately it isn't a very good film and some of the acting is so awful it has to be seen to be believed.So not one of the shining moments of British cinema.
  • rmax3048231 January 2014
    Warning: Spoilers
    B Gangster Movie. The eponymous "Soho" is in London, not Manhattan. The rather dull tale takes place in the fancy night club run by the American gangster, Jack La Rue, which I suppose would be "Jack of the street" in French -- if his real name weren't Gaspare Biondilillo. His dark, villainous looks and his oily performance, come out one step below George Raft. He annoys me even more because I keep getting him mixed up with "Lash" La Rue. They're simply going to have to change their names post mortem if I'm going to keep them straight.

    Bernard Lee, in a prominent role, is almost unrecognizably youthful as an ambitious reporter. Arthur O'Connell IS unrecognizable as one of La Rue's goons except for one monstrous five-second close up. The woman in question, a blond mole working for the police, is Sandra Storme, who can't really act and isn't especially beautiful, but who has an angular and fragile figure that prompts thoughts of nurturance in the viewer. She looks as if you could take one of her long bones and snap it in two like a breadstick in an Italian restaurant.

    I'm kind of just skimming the plot because it's not very original or even interesting. One of La Rue's gangster subordinates threatens to take over the mob or go to the police. He produces a pistol. La Rue shoots him dead and the other goons dump the body in a doorway on the street. The police inspector, Walker Martin, who is always poking people and things with his brolly, suspects La Rue and his gang and enlists the aid of chorus girl Storme to get enough evidence to convict him.

    There are a couple of cute and amusing scenes. When the inspector shows up at a murder scene, the two thugs act as if the dead body is merely a sick friend who had a "rough crossing" on the ferry. "His temperature is going' down, boss. I think he's getting' better." "I don't think he'll get any worse."

    And when the inspector asks Googie Withers if she knows anyone who might have murdered the victim, she replies in all sincerity, "All I can think of is that it must have been someone who didn't like him very much."

    Here's the most nearly original element of the plot. Jack La Rue's character -- who has "ideas above his station" as the Brits might put it -- calls for an outright greedy, egocentric, and libidinous thug. Instead the writers have made him almost sympathetic, despite all that snarling. It's easy to sympathize with him when the realization that he's been betrayed by a spy he was in love with finally sinks in.

    Ditto at the climax. La Rue is about to flee to France with all his money but stops for a last look around his night club where dozens of customers are enjoying themselves. A former girl friend sneaks up behind him. La Rue had dismissed her earlier: "I don't mean to be unkind but you've got no class." But La Rue, for all his canniness, has forgotten that hell hath no fury like a woman scorned.

    The first hour drags monotonously. Bernard Miles has nothing to do but show up once in a while until he can collect the virtuous blond at the end. The film matures a bit during its last half hour.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    It's a British entry from 1939 takes place in a nightclub in London. Staring is the evil LaRue and some unknown mousy thing he falls for cause she's got class. LaRue kills a double crosser who turns out to be Ms. Class' ex-husband. Then the suave police inspector arrives with his cane and investigates. He's dapper. Scenes and shots of the activity in the snazzy nightclub. Twists. Turns. Finally, LaRue has to split in a hurry and his old flame who he dumped for Ms. Class begs him to take her on his escape to France from London, she shoves her aside, so she shoots him. Police arrive. LaRue's henchmen are rounded up. Miss Class ends up marrying someone, whoever. Whatever. It's not an awful movie, it's just mediocre. Ho-Hum.