The Wizard of Oz (1939)

PG   |    |  Adventure, Family, Fantasy


The Wizard of Oz (1939) Poster

Dorothy Gale is swept away from a farm in Kansas to a magical land of Oz in a tornado and embarks on a quest with her new friends to see the Wizard who can help her return home to Kansas and help her friends as well.


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  • The Wizard of Oz (1939)
  • Jack Haley in The Wizard of Oz (1939)
  • The Wizard of Oz (1939)
  • The Wizard of Oz (1939)
  • Judy Garland and Jack Haley in The Wizard of Oz (1939)
  • Margaret Hamilton and Pat Walshe in The Wizard of Oz (1939)

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User Reviews


8 December 2000 | llihilloh
I wish I could have followed the yellow brick road.
I remember watching this movie when they would air it once a year on CBS a few years back. Now it is shown on a couple of different networks quite frequently. This is a wonderful film for the whole family. Who wouldn't want to take a journey to the magical land of Oz?

I think that it is terrific how well this movie has held up over the years. It's going on sixty-two years since it was first released and yet, it is timeless. It is great to look back on a film that was made in the thirties, and compare it to the movies made in this day and age. This is a film that will just be something that stays around forever.

The Wizard of Oz is enjoyable for people of all ages. Everything about it brings a smile to my face. Wouldn't it be wonderful to just magically be transported to a land of talking trees and little munchkins? Of course it would be. The flying monkeys, a talking lion, the astounding ruby slippers, and everything else adds a special kind of magic to the screen.

The atmosphere and setting is magnificent. This is one of the things that makes the film so stunning. Anyway, the forest, the witch's castle, and even the farm is really well laid out.

I don't think that the casting could have been done any better. Judy Garland shines as the innocent Kansas girl. Her dancing and singing just brightens the whole story up. The lion, tin man, and scarecrow perform amazingly also. Everyone involved down to the littlest munchkin acts so well.

Even though this is a movie for everyone, it is categorized as a children's flick. The writing is good with very simple lines and problems, but slightly complex so we're not falling asleep of boredom.

What's left to say? Other things like the wardrobe, special effects, musical talents, and even the famous yellow brick road, are so well put together. Oz gives us an idea of what an almost perfect world would be like. No matter how old this movie becomes and we still look back on it, we'll still be able to enjoy at least one thoughtful movie. Classics never die. (Hence the name.)

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Did You Know?

Trivia

The film, while run on network television, used to be packaged as a special event and, as such, was initially introduced by on-camera hosts (including Red Skelton, Dick Van Dyke and Danny Kaye). This practice ended after CBS' first contract with the film ended in 1967. From 1968 on the film was aired host-less, save the 1970 broadcast which was the first to air following the death of star Judy Garland. Gregory Peck gave a short tribute to her before the film aired that year on NBC. Ironically, when the film went into the Turner vault and began airing on Turner Classic Movies, it returned to hosted introductions, usually by TCM's Robert Osborne. The same is true for recent airings on the Cartoon Network--it is one of the few live-action films to be shown on that channel--but whenever it is shown on Turner Network Television or the CW network, it is not hosted.


Quotes

Dorothy: She isn't coming yet, Toto. Did she hurt you? She tried to, didn't she? Come on. We'll go tell Uncle Henry and Auntie Em.


Goofs

When Dorothy and Toto first arrive at the cornfield the Scarecrow is nowhere to be seen but after Dorothy wonders which way they should go the Scarecrow appears out of nowhere.


Crazy Credits

The Oz characters that Frank Morgan, Ray Bolger, Jack Haley, Bert Lahr and Margaret Hamilton play are not actually listed in the cast list at the end; only their Kansas counterparts are. However, Billie Burke (who plays only Glinda the Good Witch) and Pat Walshe, who plays only Nikko, the Head Monkey, *are* listed in the closing credits as having played those characters.


Alternate Versions

All prints shown/made from 1955 to 1988 have the Kansas scenes in black and white, not the original sepia tones. The 1989 50th anniversary video cassette restores the sepia color of the Kansas scenes. All theatrical re-releases, TV airings, and video releases since then have the scenes in the sepia tones.


Soundtracks

We're Off to See the Wizard
(1939) (uncredited)
Lyrics by
E.Y. Harburg
Music by Harold Arlen
Sung by Judy Garland and Ray Bolger

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Adventure | Family | Fantasy | Musical

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