Fantasia (1940)

G   |    |  Animation, Family, Fantasy


Fantasia (1940) Poster

A collection of animated interpretations of great works of Western classical music.


7.8/10
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18 October 2017 | sethsholtes
A human Movie
2017 is a year of technical marvel. Looking at movies of today, we see massive, stunning works of animation. We can now achieve computer generated images that look nearly indistinguishable from reality, and at the forefront of movie making today is Disney. Through Marvel, Disney creates multiple action packed superhero blockbusters a year. Star Wars, after it's 2015 revival, has new movies being released annually. Pixar, after creating several successful franchises, is now resting on its laurels, creating sequels like Finding Dory, Toy Story 4, Cars 3 and Incredibles 2. Even Disney's in house animation team is finding success, bringing back the Disney princess formula with movies like Frozen and Moana. However, amidst all this success, we have lost the truly human touch. Fantasia perfectly captures all that was lost in today's Disney movies. The movie has a very personal and human feel to every aspect of it. The orchestra, a very tangible presence in the movie, feels alive. They laugh, play their own little tunes during the intermission, but most importantly, they make mistakes. The animation is the same way, It's very rough at times and sometimes lacking, with some animations being reused, however every shot is filled with passion. You can tell that people worked on this, people with ambition, though they were not perfect. In modern movies, this beautiful animation that looks so real lacks the touch of individualism that Fantasia has in spades. The scene of the Sorcerer's apprentice dancing around the broom is burned into our collective memory for a reason. In all its flaws, its rough edges, it feels real to us. We can see all the raw effort and energy that the animator's put into each of Mickey's footsteps and that resonates with us. Fantasia speaks to the viewer not because it's perfect, but because it's flawed.

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Did You Know?

Trivia

Selected by the Vatican in the "art" category of its list of 45 "great films."


Quotes

Deems Taylor: How do you do? Uh, my name is Deems Taylor, and it's my very pleasant duty to welcome you here on behalf of Walt Disney, Leopold Stokowski, and all the other artists and musicians whose combined talents went into the creation of this new form of ...


Goofs

The Pastoral sequence has Iris sweeping across the sky after the storm, leaving a rainbow in her wake. The colors of the rainbow are reversed: Red should be at the top and violet at the bottom.


Crazy Credits

The "Fantasia" title card for all releases prior to 1990 (including the original roadshow version) was slightly different from the one seen in the 1990 re-release and in the videocassette version. In the original title card, the letters spelling out the word "Fantasia" are of a slightly different shade of color, as is the blue background, and the title card reads "In Technicolor", just below the word "Fantasia". There is also an RKO logo at the bottom. In the 1990 version, there is no RKO logo, and below the title it says "Color By Technicolor".


Alternate Versions

Walt Disney had originally intended to incorporate a segment set to Debussy's "Claire de Lune" into the original version of the Film. This scene was fully scored, recorded, and the clean-up animation finished when it was deleted from the already excessive lengthy film. "Clair De Lune" was completed as a standalone short (and for possible insertion as a new segment for insertion into a future version of the film) in 1942, but it was never released. The footage for this segment was re-scored and re-edited as the "Blue Bayou" sequence in Make Mine Music (1946). The complete version of "Clair de Lune" was though to have been lost until 1992, when a complete nitrate workprint of the entire sequence was located. "Clair de Lune" was finally completed and exhibited in 1996, 44 years after it had been created. This version features a remix of the original Fantasound tracks and altered live-action orchestra footage from the regular version of Fantasia, to fill in for the half-minute of missing Leopold Stokowski/Philadelphia Orchestra footage that precedes the animated part of this segment. The 1996 version of "Clair de Lune" is available in the Fantasia Anthology DVD box set.


Soundtracks

A Night on Bald Mountain/Ave Maria
"A Night on Bald Mountain" (1867) Composed by
Modest Mussorgsky (as Modeste Moussorgsky)
"Ave Maria, Op. 52 No. 6" (1825) Composed by Franz Schubert
Orchestrated by Leopold Stokowski (uncredited)
Both Works and Transitional Material Arranged by Leopold Stokowski (uncredited)
Played by The Philadelphia Orchestra
Special Lyrics for "Ave Maria" by Rachel Field
Sung in English by the Westminster Choir of Westminster Choir College with soprano soloist Julietta Novis
Choral Director: Charles Henderson
Conducted by Leopold Stokowski

Storyline

Plot Summary


Genres

Animation | Family | Fantasy | Music

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