The Shop Around the Corner (1940)

Not Rated   |    |  Comedy, Drama, Romance


The Shop Around the Corner (1940) Poster

Two employees at a gift shop can barely stand each other, without realizing that they are falling in love through the post as each other's anonymous pen pal.


8.1/10
26,481

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  • James Stewart and Margaret Sullavan in The Shop Around the Corner (1940)
  • James Stewart and Margaret Sullavan in The Shop Around the Corner (1940)
  • Margaret Sullavan in The Shop Around the Corner (1940)
  • James Stewart and Margaret Sullavan in The Shop Around the Corner (1940)
  • James Stewart and Margaret Sullavan in The Shop Around the Corner (1940)
  • James Stewart and Margaret Sullavan in The Shop Around the Corner (1940)

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Awards

2 wins.

Reviews & Commentary

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User Reviews


19 December 2004 | jotix100
10
| Pen pals in Budapest
Ernst Lubitsch's contribution to the American cinema is enormous. His legacy is an outstanding group of movies that will live forever, as is the case with "The Shop Around the Corner". This film has been remade into other less distinguished movies and a musical play, without the charm or elegance of Mr. Lubitsch's own, and definite version.

Margaret Sullavan and James Stewart worked in several films together. Their characters in this movie stand out as an example of how to be in a movie without almost appearing to be acting at all. Both stars are delightful as the pen pals that don't know of one another, but who fate had them working together in the same shop in Budapest.

The reason why these classic films worked so well is the amazing supporting casts the studios put together in picture after picture. In here, we have the wonderful Frank Morgan, playing the owner of the shop. Also, we see Joseph Schildkraut, Felix Bressart, William Tracy and Charles Smith, among others, doing impressive work in making us believe that yes, they are in Budapest.

That is why these films will live forever!

Metacritic Reviews


Critic Reviews



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Did You Know?

Trivia

The original source material for this plot, the 1937 play "Illatszertár" (in English, titled "Parfumerie") by the Hungarian writer Miklós László, has been adapted into numerous other movies and plays. The first film adaptation was The Shop Around the Corner (1940) starring Margaret Sullavan and James Stewart. The first musical adaptation was In the Good Old Summertime (1949), which starred Judy Garland and Van Johnson. In 1963, a second musical adaptation, "She Loves Me," premiered on Broadway; its first production, which starred Daniel Massey as Georg Nowack and Barbara Cook, was a critical success but a box-office disappointment. A 1993 Broadway revival (starring Boyd Gaines and Judy Kuhn) met the same fate, as did a third Broadway mounting in 2016 (with Laura Benanti, Zachary Levi, and Jane Krakowski). While MGM planned a film version of "She Loves Me" designed to reunite Julie Andrews and Dick Van Dyke following Mary Poppins (1964), it was ultimately scrapped. A third film version of the story came about in You've Got Mail (1998), which updated the plot to embrace the techno age and starred Meg Ryan and Tom Hanks.


Quotes

Pirovitch: He
Pirovitch: picks on me, too. The other day he called me an idiot. What could I do? I said, "Yes, Mr. Matuschek. I'm an idiot." I'm no fool!


Goofs

When Klara hurries out of the back room with her hat and coat she rushes past the rest of the employees as they enter the room in a group. Flora is the second-to-last person in the line and she is clearly inside the room before Klara runs past. In the next cut showing Klara hurrying through the store, Flora is the last person in line and is still in the doorway.


Crazy Credits

Opening Card: This is the story of Matuschek and Company - of Mr. Matuschek and the people who work for him. It is just around the corner from Andrassy Street - on Balta Strreet, in Budapest, Hungary.


Alternate Versions

Has been broadcast in a colorized version.


Soundtracks

Ochi Tchornya (Dark Eyes)
(uncredited)
Traditional Russian folk song
Played by the cigarette case and later by the string quartet at the cafe

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Comedy | Drama | Romance

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