The Great American Broadcast (1941)

  |  Comedy, Musical, Romance


The Great American Broadcast (1941) Poster

After WWI two men go into radio. Failure leads the wife of one to borrow money from another; she goes on, after separation, to stardom. A coast-to-coast radio program is set up to bring ... See full summary »


6.6/10
212

Photos

  • Alice Faye and John Payne in The Great American Broadcast (1941)
  • Alice Faye and John Payne in The Great American Broadcast (1941)
  • Alice Faye and John Payne in The Great American Broadcast (1941)
  • Alice Faye and John Payne in The Great American Broadcast (1941)
  • John Payne in The Great American Broadcast (1941)
  • Alice Faye and John Payne in The Great American Broadcast (1941)

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Cast & Crew

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Director:

Archie Mayo

Writers:

Don Ettlinger (original screen play), Edwin Blum (original screen play), Robert Ellis (original screen play), Helen Logan (original screen play)

Reviews & Commentary

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User Reviews


5 January 2006 | sryder-1
8
| Routine Plot, but has some good musical numbers
During the first twenty minutes or so there is actually some loose correspondence between the actual early history of radio and the history as presented here: the broadcast of a heavyweight prize fight, the proposal to broadcast a national political convention, the commercial link between the development of broadcasting and the sale of radios for home entertainment; and also the way national broadcasts began. The opening sequence before the title would have caught the attention of film goers in the forties, with brief clips of jack Benny, Fred Allen, Kate smith, Walter Winchell and other radio stars. Unfortunately, the origin and evolution of radio broadcasting becomes merely the background for a clichéd romance. However, there are some entertaining musical moments along the way. Jack Oakie stands out from the rest of the cast because of his energy, while Alice Faye, a favorite of mine from the 1930s, sings well, but seems mostly tired, except when she and Oakie are performing a song and dance number together. John Payne, Fox's back-up leading man (after Tyrone Power, who had moved on to major dramatic roles by this time), always does his job in a professional, though bland, manner. The Nicholas Brothers always impress. 20th Century Fox seemed to find some way of working them into most of the 1940s musicals. On the other hand, the Wiere Brothers are truly tiresome, supposedly performing over the radio an act that has to be seen to be enjoyed (or not, in this case). This review may sound more negative than I intended. In fact, most viewers will enjoy this hour and a half for what it is.

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