Star Spangled Rhythm (1942)

Approved   |    |  Comedy, Musical


Star Spangled Rhythm (1942) Poster

A Paramount Studios security guard who was a major actor during the silent film era must carry out the illusion that he is still a big deal when his sailor son comes to visit.


6.6/10
514


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Photos

  • Bob Hope in Star Spangled Rhythm (1942)
  • William Bendix and Bob Hope in Star Spangled Rhythm (1942)
  • Veronica Lake, Paulette Goddard, and Dorothy Lamour in Star Spangled Rhythm (1942)
  • Alan Ladd, Veronica Lake, Susan Hayward, Paulette Goddard, Betty Hutton, Dona Drake, Dorothy Lamour, Mary Martin, Victor Moore, Marjorie Reynolds, Betty Jane Rhodes, and Vera Zorina in Star Spangled Rhythm (1942)
  • Veronica Lake, Bing Crosby, Bob Hope, Paulette Goddard, Eddie Bracken, Dorothy Lamour, and Franchot Tone in Star Spangled Rhythm (1942)
  • Alan Ladd, Veronica Lake, William Bendix, Bing Crosby, Susan Hayward, Bob Hope, Ray Milland, Paulette Goddard, Betty Hutton, Eddie 'Rochester' Anderson, Eddie Bracken, Macdonald Carey, Jerry Colonna, Dorothy Lamour, Fred MacMurray, Mary Martin, Victor Moore, Dick Powell, Betty Jane Rhodes, Franchot Tone, Vera Zorina, and The Golden Gate Quartette in Star Spangled Rhythm (1942)

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Cast & Crew

Top Billed Cast



Directors:

George Marshall , A. Edward Sutherland

Writers:

Harry Tugend (original screenplay), George S. Kaufman (sketches), Arthur A. Ross (sketches), Melvin Frank (sketches), Norman Panama (sketches)

Reviews & Commentary

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User Reviews


9 November 2007 | bkoganbing
9
| Doing It For Defense
Betty Hutton, one of the nominal stars of Star Spangled Rhythm, was not just doing it for defense as in her number, but the whole studio was doing this All Star flag waver for the defense of the morale of the USA.

I can never resist one of these all star spectaculars and there's only one I would ever have given a bad review to, and this isn't the one. Everybody working on the Paramount lot got to do his bit for defense in this film, some bits being longer than others.

The nominal plot of this film has Betty Hutton as a switchboard girl at Paramount studios and Victor Moore, a former silent western star, now working as a security guard at the studio trying to convince Eddie Bracken and a bunch of his sailor buddies that Moore is really the head of the studio. For that they have to con and bamboozle Walter Abel who is a real studio executive out of his office and off the lot so they can do their masquerade uninterrupted.

Of course Bracken asks the inevitable, pop can you get all these stars down for a big Navy show, and the con has to continue. But all of this nonsense is just an excuse for some musical and comedy numbers by the Paramount players.

Harold Arlen and Johnny Mercer wrote the score and out of it came two really big standards, That Old Black Magic which was nominated for Best Song that year, but lost to another Paramount film song, White Christmas and Hit the Road to Dreamland.

The latter was done as director Preston Sturges was playing himself and screening a musical number from his latest film. As the projector rolls on screen it's Dick Powell and Mary Martin on a Pullman car singing about finally hitting the hay after some romance. The scene is so well done I wish it was included as an integral part of a real film.

That Old Black Magic is sung by Johnny Johnson and danced by ballet star Vera Zorina. It was enormous hit that year, recorded by a flock of singers. Oddly enough not by Bing Crosby though he got to sing it in another film, Here Come the Waves.

Of course the finale is a wartime flag waving number with Bing Crosby singing Old Glory about the flag and the wonders of the country behind it. The number about the flag probably wouldn't fly today still and that's a pity.

It's even more of a pity that these musical extravaganzas are a thing of the past with the decline of the Hollywood studio system. Star Spangled Rhythm is one of the best of its kind.

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Box Office

Gross USA:

$602,500

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