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Woman of the Year (1942)

Passed   |    |  Comedy, Drama, Romance


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Rival reporters Sam and Tess fall in love and get married, only to find their relationship strained when Sam comes to resent Tess' hectic lifestyle.

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7.3/10
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  • Katharine Hepburn in Woman of the Year (1942)
  • Katharine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy in Woman of the Year (1942)
  • Katharine Hepburn in Woman of the Year (1942)
  • Katharine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy in Woman of the Year (1942)
  • Katharine Hepburn in Woman of the Year (1942)
  • Katharine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy in Woman of the Year (1942)

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User Reviews


30 December 2005 | Polaris_DiB
8
| Real fun.
A lot of reviews on romantic comedies and the like talk about this thing called "chemistry" between actors, when it seems the two actors are capable of really presenting true, real life emotions between them. When it comes to the Spenser Tracy/Katherine Hepburn pairing, the word "chemistry" is used quite often. The thing about it is, though, that this stuff goes way beyond chemistry. This is real, honest-to-life drama.

Spenser Tracy's character is utterly relatable. He reacts and he does what it seems any guy of the era, or even today, would do in such a situation. His character is torn between his absolute adoration of Tess, and the knowledge that not only will he never amount to what Tess is, he also is pretty much emasculated by her self-actualization.

And for Katherine Hepburn, who plays Tess, there couldn't have been a better role. Hepburn, who was naturally independent anyway, plays the role of a knowledgeable Woman's Woman without needing an extra breath.

The thing about the films with these two are that they actually present a relationship, not just a courtship and a "and then they lived happily ever after, for all time" ending. They show the real issues with communication, work, space, and borders, everything that must be understood about a person to make it work. And they are absolutely adoring of each other.

Just like in the later film, Adam's Rib (1949), this film presents the issues and friction in their relationship almost spectacularly well from both sides. I can't say that this film was as good as Adam's Rib (George Steven's directing is just a tad off-balanced and the pacing is a little uneven), but at any rate it's a real joy to watch, from the beginning courting to the slapstick ending.

--PolarisDiB

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