Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man (1943)

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Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man (1943) Poster

The resurrected Wolf Man, seeking a cure for his malady, enlists the aid of a mad scientist, who claims he will not only rid the Wolf Man of his nocturnal metamorphosis, but also revive the frozen body of Frankenstein's inhuman creation.


6.5/10
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  • Martha Vickers in Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man (1943)
  • Bela Lugosi in Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man (1943)
  • Bela Lugosi and Ilona Massey in Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man (1943)
  • Bela Lugosi and Lon Chaney Jr. in Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man (1943)
  • Ilona Massey and Gil Perkins in Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man (1943)
  • Bela Lugosi and Lon Chaney Jr. in Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man (1943)

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Reviews & Commentary

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User Reviews


8 February 2005 | simeon_flake
8
| Universal Smackdown
One must pity the Wolf Man. Marked not only with the pentagram, but marked to never have a sequel that was all his own. A real shame, considering that even the likes of the Mummy got 'four' sequels. Universal begins their monster-mash rallies of the 1940s here, as Wolfie must share his sandbox with the "undying monster" & the two get along well for the most part, but eventually, even the best of friends will have their disputes....

The film begins on a very high note, with one of the most chilling and atmospheric openings in any horror movie. The potential was certainly here for a great 'Wolf Man' sequel that could've surpassed the original. Too bad the monster has to rear his ugly, stitched up head.

Speaking of that monster, "Poor Bela" always get the blame dumped on him for why this film had to be chopped up in post-production, the story always being that the monster with his voice was simply too "Hungarian funny", yet this film was produced by the same Universal that a year earlier made "Ghost of Frankenstein" which featured the monster with Bela's voice. It didn't bother anyone then, so what was the problem now? There has to be more to the story than "it was all Lugosi's fault". Would it be considered out of the realm of possibility to speculate that perhaps the great Curt Siodmak (the screenwriter) wrote some seriously crappy dialogue for the creature to recite that would've produced titters no matter who spoke it?

Also marring the proceedings a bit is some shaky continuity in regards to the monster's portion of the story if you're familiar with the previous 'Ghost' movie. How is it, that there's suddenly a Frankenstein castle in Vasaria (or is it Vi·Saria), when in the previous film, the villagers in the town called "Frankenstein" blew it up. And there are many instances where the screenwriter doesn't seem to know the difference between Ludwig Frankenstein & his father Henry who made the monster, as Talbot, the villagers, even Baroness Frankenstein speak as if Ludwig actually created the monster.

And yet, in spite of its inconsistencies (not to mention the heavy editing done to it), the whole of 'FMTWM' still turns out very good, and the ending clash of the monsters is very entertaining. While Frankenstein fans may be disappointed, this picture definitely works as a great 'Wolf Man' sequel & one of the top Universal romps from the 1940s. After this picture, Dracula and a few other fiends would get invited to the monster party.

8/10

Critic Reviews



Did You Know?

Trivia

When The Monster's dialogue was deleted (see Alternate Versions), also removed were any references to The Monster being blind - a side-effect of Ygor's brain being implanted into The Monster at the end of The Ghost of Frankenstein (1942). As a result, Lugosi's sleepwalker-like lumbering gait with arms outstretched is not explained and became the subject of ridicule. It also established the Frankenstein Monster-walk stereotype.


Quotes

Freddy Jolly - Graverobber: 'Lawrence Stewart Talbot, who died at the youthful age of thirty one. R.I.P.' That's it. Give me the chisel.
Graverobber: Suppose they didn't bury him with the money on him.
Freddy Jolly - Graverobber: Everybody in the village knows about it - his gold watch and ring and money in his pockets.


Goofs

When the moon rises to transform Talbot in the hospital, moonlight is shown moving across the floor then up the wall to his bed. A rising moon would cast its light first on the wall, then move down the wall to the floor as the moon rose above the horizon.


Crazy Credits

A scientist's hand is shown pouring a chemical into a flask, which bubbles over in vapor that coalesces into the film's title and cast names.


Alternate Versions

Original preview prints of the film included Lugosi speaking dialog as the Monster. Apparently, preview audiences found Lugosi's Hungarian accent hilarious coming from the Monster's mouth, so Lugosi's voice was deleted.


Soundtracks

Faro-La, Faro-Li
(uncredited)
Lyrics by
Curt Siodmak
Music by Hans J. Salter
Sung by Adia Kuznetzoff

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Fantasy | Horror | Sci-Fi

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