• WARNING: Spoilers

    Upon completing another successful mission, Flying Tigers Fred Atwell, Richard Merlin and Reginald Fenton are given a hero's welcome and a ten-day leave. The three pilots are then sent cross-country on a personal appearance tour, but when Fred tires of the acclaim and attention, he jumps off the train in a small western town, dons a cowboy hat and boots and hitches a ride to New York City. At the Colonial Club, Fred becomes infatuated by nightclub photographer Joan Manyon. Bored with snapping celebrity photographs, Joan begs her boss, magazine publisher Phil Harriman, for a war-related assignment. To get Joan's attention, Fred pops into her shots and then follows her to a diner after she finishes work. Reluctant to discuss his feats, Fred introduces himself as Fred Burton and receives a lecture from Joan about the seriousness of the war. After following Joan home, Fred rents a room in her apartment building, and the next morning, she awakens to find Fred cooking breakfast in her kitchen. Joan delivers another lecture to Fred about his lack of commitment, and then leaves for work. There Fred visits her later that afternoon, and Joan agrees to join him for dinner if he will talk to Harriman about a job the next day. That night, Joan insists upon going to work at the Canteen, where she and Fred are drafted to fill in for a dancing act. After completing his performance, Fred sees Reg and Richard at the Canteen and begs them to keep his identity secret. The next morning, Reg visits Fred at his apartment with orders to report to duty in two days. After Reg leaves, Fred goes to keep his appointment with Harriman and, after admitting that he is not interested in a job, begins to question the publisher about his intentions toward Joan. When Harriman discloses that Joan has refused his marriage proposal, Fred offers him advice about how to woo her and suggests that Harriman invite her to a romantic dinner at his apartment that night. Following Fred's advice, Harriman invites Joan to dinner, but when he realizes that she has fallen in love with Fred, he tells her that Fred is waiting for her at the apartment. That night, Joan proposes marriage to a surprised Fred and insists upon introducing him to Harvey J. Sloane, the founder of Sloane Aircraft, so that he can ask for a job. The night before Fred is to rejoin his squadron, he accompanies Joan to a banquet honoring Sloane. When Fred insults Sloane about the performance of his aircraft, Sloane tells Joan, who angrily walks out on Fred. Harriman then invites Fred to join him at his favorite bar, where he discloses that he knows Fred's true identity. Fred confides that although he loves Joan, he is unable to make a commitment to her because of the risky nature of his calling. After Harriman leaves, Fred continues drinking and destroys the bar in an angry dance. The next morning, Harriman commiserates with Joan over Fred and assigns her to photograph a squadron of American bombers flying to Australia on a mission. Joan hurries to the airport, where she sees Fred in uniform, readying to board his plane. After the two embrace, Fred promises to come back to her and proclaims his love.